#1
Hi, I have a question.

After doing some research, I found that most people say that when buying a new amp, you should always use the same guitar or your own guitar since it's the amp you're testing and not the guitar.

Also, when buying a new guitar, you should always try to use the same amps at the shops (preferably the amp that you own) since its not the amp that you're testing but the guitar.

Well heres the issue. I'm looking to upgrade to a better new guitar AND a new amp (around 50w?). The current guitar I have is a squier california series which is very cheap. The amp I have is a roland cube 15.

So if I was to go by that theory above, should I go to the guitar shops and test the guitars that I am checking out on a roland cube 15? At least I'll be able to compare the sound to my current guitar's sound... But I think testing it on a roland 15 cube wont really do justice to the guitar that I want to buy. However, if I buy the guitar after testing it, it might not really sound too great on the new upgraded amp that I get...

How would you suggest I go about buying a new guitar and amp?

Thanks!
#2
How much are you willing to spend on either? Are you looking for tube, as far as the amp goes?
#3
Just pick out the guitar you think sounds best and then buy the amp that sounds the best with it.
#4
^^couldn't have said it better...
"Well, yeah, sometimes I get a little too creative."
~Bruce Dickinson~



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"Various equipments"
#5
Yeah, what's your price range here? I'm sure users could give you lots of good advice, and what guitars sound best through what amps. Also, what style are you playin?
#6
Price range is probably AUD1500-2000 max for both together? I'm more into acoustic stuff but getting into classic and 90s rock. I won't be using the amp and guitar for any gigging or anything too fancy but something that I could use for church that could fill an auditorium.

Don't really know if I want a tube at this moment since I hear that they take alot of maintenance/fragile and for heavy rock and distortion which I doubt I'd be using much. So probably Solid state? Don't really know since I haven't really tested them out too much yet. Guess I probably should

Thanks
#7
my only opinion to answer your original question is that it is more important to use your guitar (or same) when testing Amps. When tesing guitars, I usually suggest to play them acoustically anyway as you will get a better feel for tone and quality. Hence, if you do plug into an amp, I don't think it matters as much, but in testing out guitars it would make sense to keep using the same amp so you can hear the differences better.

Basically - rule out as many other variables as you can so you can get closer to the differences.
#8
Quote by delirious.y
Don't really know if I want a tube at this moment since I hear that they take alot of maintenance/fragile and for heavy rock and distortion which I doubt I'd be using much. So probably Solid state?

This is a common misconception with tube amps, depending on the amp, you won't have to do any maintenance on it, or if you do, it'll probably only be changing tubes every two years or so, depending on how much you play it and how loud.

As for the fragile part, tube amps are, for the most part, built much better than solid state amps. There's actually quite a few that can be thrown and hit the ground hard, with no damage being done to the amp, try that with a cheaper built SS amp.

Tube amps are definitely not just for heavy rock and distortion, the first amps ever made were tube amps, they definitely weren't playing with loads of gain back then. For more mellow genres like you're playing, there's actually MANY cheaper tube amps out there that would get the job done beautifully, better than a SS in the same price range.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





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