#1
I wanna know how each of you apply lemon oil.

I've heard some leave it on for 20 mins, let it soak and then wipe it off.

I've heard of wiping it off right after sparying it, ect.


How do you apply YOUR lemon oil?

Pros and cons?
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#2
i spray on, and then wipe off after like 10 seconds...i've never thought, nor heard, of leaving it on for a longer period of time.....if it actually works better than i'll have to do that next time.


i'm waiting on positive confirmation from other UGers before i attempt that method. changing to new strings is already a somewhat tedious upkeep with polishing the whole body and avoiding scratching it, hate to add 10-20 minutes for something that has hardly any more effect than a few seconds.
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#3
Quote by slash_rocks2005
i spray on, and then wipe off after like 10 seconds...i've never thought, nor heard, of leaving it on for a longer period of time.....if it actually works better than i'll have to do that next time.


i'm waiting on positive confirmation from other UGers before i attempt that method. changing to new strings is already a somewhat tedious upkeep with polishing the whole body and avoiding scratching it, hate to add 10-20 minutes for something that has hardly any more effect than a few seconds.


from what i understand, only do that if your fingerboard is very dry, but then again, I've never tried it, so we'll have to wait for an experienced UGer to tell us how to take care of our damn boards right.
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#4
i would get into it but hitting the sack. i've posted pretty extensively on this topic.

some say wipe it off right away, other say let it soak in for 5 - 20 minutes, some say don't do it at all.

I do it maybe twice a year. I let it soak in for 10 min. Don't use 100% lemon oil get the guitar spray.

SEARCH: Cleaning Rosewood Fretboards.

I am assuming you have ebony or rosewood. You don't want to do this with maple.
#5
Hmmm,, Well I definitely wouldn't leave lemon oil on the fretboard for 20 minutes as putting lemon oil on dries the fretboard already, and leaving it on for that long would seem to cause more harm.
#6
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
i would get into it but hitting the sack. i've posted pretty extensively on this topic.

some say wipe it off right away, other say let it soak in for 5 - 20 minutes, some say don't do it at all.

I do it maybe twice a year. I let it soak in for 10 min. Don't use 100% lemon oil get the guitar spray.

SEARCH: Cleaning Rosewood Fretboards.

I am assuming you have ebony or rosewood. You don't want to do this with maple.


oh thx for reminding me...i own the spray.

DIRECTIONS: Shake well before using spray lem-oil on a clean soft cloth. Playy to surface. Rub. Rolish to desired luster with another dry cloth. If surface remains dry there is a wax build up. Reapply and let stand for 20mins before wiping dry.

This is from kyser klassic dr. stringfellow LEM OIL spray.

Still there are different ways and would like to hear opinions also
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#7
I have the same stuff. Dr. Stringfellow.

Personally, I think 20 min is too long. I just spray it on and then kind of lightly rub it in so all the wood is covered and then let it sit. Then after you wipe it down real good, let it sit some more because the oil will actually seep back out, maybe not a lot, but you just wipe it down again.

It is my opinion that Lemon Oil preseves the wood, not dries it out. Never put water on it or use an old toothbush. A new tooth brush works great for getting really dirty places. This topic comes up a lot over in Electric Guitar.

I also have used, twice now, .0000 (4 dot) steel wool to lightly clean off board and polish the frets going WITH the wood grain not parallel to the frets. Here is a link that talks about that and Lemon Oil. Yes you can flame me if you want.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=842673&page=1&pp=20&highlight=.0000

Good luck
#8
I just sprayed mine, let it sit for 10 secs, rubbed it in good. got a different cloth polished the wood. I think thats the best way. It seemed to like it, but be carful not to put a lot of let it sit too long as a soggy fingerboard doesn't not sound appealing.
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#9
Quote by rokket2005
Hmmm,, Well I definitely wouldn't leave lemon oil on the fretboard for 20 minutes as putting lemon oil on dries the fretboard already, and leaving it on for that long would seem to cause more harm.

if it dries it, why do people use it then ?


what's a good alternative to hydrate the fretboard ?
#10
I use the Kyser lemon oil spray also for my guitars, banjos, and mandolin. You don't want to use it very often, just enough to keep the fingerboard from drying out too much. If a fingerboard gets too dry it can get cracks or chips or a fret might pull up. If you oil it too much it might cause problems with binding, make the fingerboard more susceptible to fingernail dents, and there will be more residue buildup. The worst thing is when a fingerboard is dry all the time and the neck is exposed to humidity and temp differences ... might warp the neck or cause the wood to shrink and make frets stick slightly out the end of the board. You don't have to worry too much about necks because they are sealed, but fretboards are usually exposed wood and do need to be oiled every now and then. All this mostly applies to mahogany, rosewood, and ebony ... maple is so hard and dense it doesn't need the same level of care.

Basically just keep an eye on the fingerboard and when it seems like it's getting too dry put a little lemon oil on a rag and rub it into the board. The fingerboard will soak up all or most of the oil after a minute or so. Then buff between all the frets with a dry cloth. Doesn't need to be done often, maybe every 6 months or a year.
#11
I've never used lemon oil. I use a fretboard oil made by fender and it works great. I've met so many people that don't treat their fretboard and the wood looks really thirsty. You can see the cracks and its dry and wood chipping off of it. Best to do it every string change. Also makes the guitar play better. Not to mention look better.
#12
I think we need to draw the distinction between using pure and actual lemon oil that you get from the hardware store, etc. and lemon fretboard conditioner from the music shop.

Most people who say 'lemon oil' are referring to the latter, not actual lemon oil.
#13
Quote by solidsnake15
I've never used lemon oil. I use a fretboard oil made by fender and it works great. I've met so many people that don't treat their fretboard and the wood looks really thirsty. You can see the cracks and its dry and wood chipping off of it. Best to do it every string change. Also makes the guitar play better. Not to mention look better.


I think the general concensus is to NOT do it that often. You can actually over do it.

What you should do often tho is String Cleaner/Spray for the strings before or after you play. Dr. Stringfellow and others have this product too. You spray it on a cloth and run it up and down the strings. Makes them slippery and prolongs the life of the strings. It smells like lemon oil so I'm sure it is very similar to the fretboard cleaner.

Someone is going to get on here and give the 'Chapped Lips' analogy and you can then have a different perspective.
#14
You aren't supposed to apply much but i've had more than one guitar instructers recommend doing it every string change. I have been doing it every string change for 10 years and I've never had a problem. Just a smooth fretboard. Lemon oil you might can do it to much I'm not sure. The fretboard cleaner that i purchase recommends to do it every string change so I guess it is safe for it. I've been using the same type for years. Lemon oil like I said might be a different story.
#15
Quote by solidsnake15
You aren't supposed to apply much but i've had more than one guitar instructers recommend doing it every string change. I have been doing it every string change for 10 years and I've never had a problem. Just a smooth fretboard. Lemon oil you might can do it to much I'm not sure. The fretboard cleaner that i purchase recommends to do it every string change so I guess it is safe for it. I've been using the same type for years. Lemon oil like I said might be a different story.


Cool.

And yeah, I have never referred to lemon oil treatment as 100% lemon oil. I'm only talking the spray for guitars. Well, if you have been doing it every string change for 10 years then that is noteworthy. You've been playing longer than I.
#16
All these "lemon oil" products for fingerboards are just mineral oil with a lemon scent. Mineral oil is a petroleum derivative and it naturally reeks, so the "lemon oil" products for fretboards are purified and deodorized mineral oil with lemon scent added. So don't mash a lemon into your fingerboard thinking that will work or anything

I was told by somebody who is a very accomplished builder & player that sesame oil also works, but have not personally tried it. I don't know about the Fender fretboard oil, but lemon oil is probably ok for every string change if applied very sparingly. Bad things can happen if too much oil is applied and it gets under the frets.