#1
My Gibson Les Paul is a 2004 limited edition Custom Historic 68. I love it to bits, but the finish on the neck is driving me nuts. I can't play for more than 10 minutes without it becoming sticky, gluey and really uncomfortable. This reduces the speed at which I can play, but more importantly - it really feels terrible to the touch. I always treat my guitars with the attention they deserve and wash my hands before and after play. But there is no cure to this.

I have read many opinions (here, as well as other forums) and many Gibson owners seem to complain of stickyness on their necks, especially when their guitars are new / newish.

It appears that the problem resides in the type of paint that Gibson uses on some models. As a contrast, satin finished necks seem to be smooth and silky to the touch, just like the maple necks that Fender uses (I own a Strat and the feeling on that is just orgasmic in comparison to the Les Paul).

Some people seem to use baby oil before they play, but this sounds like a temporary cure.

The only REAL and definite cure seems to be sanding the neck ever so slightly, so that the top layer of paint (which is more porous) can be removed.

I have read many people doing this to their Les Pauls, but I am in disbelief that there is no other way to solve this.

So, long story short, I have purchased some sand paper (really fine grit) and am ready to go.

My question is - what is the best way to do this, so that there are no visual effects of this operation? Quite frankly, I don't think I will keep this guitar all my life and at some point I would like to sell it, so I would like to minimize the permanent effects of any operation of this type.

Any recommendations?

Thanks
#2
The best way to do it is to just break it in. Use it as your main/only guitar til it goes away. Sanding it will decrease the value tons.
Cam Sampbell's my hero
#3
Most guitar/bass stuff are like shoes, you need to break them in before they become comfortable.
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#4
Thanks for the replies so far

Quote by lespaul#1
Most guitar/bass stuff are like shoes, you need to break them in before they become comfortable.


That's what I thought too, but the "break in" phase seems to take forever...

Any other suggestions?
#5
Quote by Sirakov
Thanks for the replies so far


That's what I thought too, but the "break in" phase seems to take forever...

Any other suggestions?

Well, it's the only way to do it if you want to keep the value. The other solution is the baby oil one, but breaking in would be better.
Cam Sampbell's my hero
#6
my gibson is the same, i was thinking i had a dud as my epiphone l/p isnt like this glad im not the only one
#7
dude i had that happen on my acoustic guitar between the second and third fret on the back..but it just went away eventually
Thanks for reading this... Ladies
#8
Dont sand it.
give it to me.
Quote by dcdossett65
Life is too short to worry about this crap.

Who.

Cares.
#9
how much is that guitar worth?

cut the value in half and if you can stand bargining to get the most from that half, then rub the neck.
if it's worth it to you, to have a guitar that plays better then do it.


as for fixing the problem, you might just do better with rubbing the neck with 0000 steel wool first.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


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#11
Quote by jj1565
how much is that guitar worth?

cut the value in half and if you can stand bargining to get the most from that half, then rub the neck.
if it's worth it to you, to have a guitar that plays better then do it.


as for fixing the problem, you might just do better with rubbing the neck with 0000 steel wool first.


I got some extra fine sand paper from Hong Kong - it's 2000, which is the minimum I have found. I think I am going to go with that and see what happens... Fingers crossed.