#1
whats the best way to go about building speed when playing scales. And also generally how long does it take to become a "good" player.
#2
keep playing them. Try using a metronome and hitting two notes per beat, find a spot where your comfortable and practice with that. Also, if you haven't learned already, learn about the chromatic scale and alternate picking. Just search it in youtube. There is a lot you can learn on this site justinguitar.com. And as for becoming a good player, it depends on how much time you put into guitar. What guitar do you have, acoustic or electric?

EDIT: oh and your new here. I'm going to give you some advice about these forums. Do not go into the subforum labeled "The Pit" Seriously, just don't, and don't ask why. I wish someone warned me not to when I first went on this site.
#3
It depends, on both counts.

It depends on how intuitive you are, how much you're willing to learn, how much time you put into it, and how much of that time is proper practice.

Working with a metronome is extremely valuable, not for speed but for timing and rythem. Don't think of speed as a result, more as a byproduct of steady practice. The more you focus on speed for speed's sake, the more frustrated you'll be because it's like standing in the mirror and watching your hair grow; you're getting faster all the time, but you don't notice.

Just work on playing the notes cleanly and in time with the metronome. Clean is FAR more important then fast because speed for speed's sake results in mush. Speed will come on it's own, proper technique takes work.
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#5
Quote by alktone
whats the best way to go about building speed when playing scales. And also generally how long does it take to become a "good" player.

The short answer is don't bother.

Think about it for a second and ask youself why you want to be able to play scales quickly...you'll find that the answer is "Actually, I don't"

You probably would like to be able to play the guitar faster, but that means improving your all-round playing ability. All practicing scales does is teach you how to play scales, and playing scales is boring to do and even more boring to listen to so what's the point?

Scales are a tool, something to use and manipulate...so the first thing to do with a scale is learn how it sounds and where the notes appear on the fretboard. The second thing is to start using it, so construct exercises using the notes of the scale but make them practical. Make sure they move you along the fretboard horizontally as well as vertically so you don't get stuck in boxes and mix up the patterns so you're not just playing straight up and down runs. There's absolutely nothing to be gained from practicing "vanilla" scales just for the sake of playing them.

As far as speed ges you just have to give it time, it's not something you can force. Speed comes from accuracy - the more precise your movements and the more exact your timing then the faster you'll be able to play. If you try to force yourself to play faster then you'll end up either screwing up or settling for playing sloppily and innacurately.
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#6
Check out Kristopher Dahl's speed lessons (found on UG or YouTube).

Just like he shows in the lesson, start with 4 notes in the Am pentatonic box and practice ONE-two-three-four ONE-two-three-four with a metronome.

It works, trust me. I'm nowhere near his speed but doing this exercise as a warmup or just messing around between playing full songs really helps build speed.

And like the others said, it just takes time. Kind of like typing...everyone starts out slow, checking where each key is, making a lot of mistakes at first, but over time the speed builds to the point where you just think the word and it comes out on the screen.
#7
There is no "generally how long", it determines on your ability to learn and store information and how much you practice and play it. A 'good' player can be deteremined by lots of things, what do u mean by good?

Michael Romeo is good because hes stupidly fast and technical, whereas Slash is good because he is emotional and feels his music. I am assuming you mean blistering fast good, but it still depends on your dedication, Im sure you can look up some guitarists you class as good and read there bios.

Quote by steven seagull


You probably would like to be able to play the guitar faster, but that means improving your all-round playing ability. All practicing scales does is teach you how to play scales, and playing scales is boring to do and even more boring to listen to so what's the point?


I agree with your whole post especially the boring and doesn't really help much, but as in learning scales whilst working on your speed, it would be better for him to practice with a scale rather than a 1234 exercise etc at this point (assuming he doesnt already know the scales inside out), hell be learning the scale fluently and building speed.. That doesnt mean to say he shouldnt do some of those horrible exercises too tho.

Another thing I like to do, mainly for warm up is play with the metronome (or a song I know) a little faster than I know I am capable of but have at it anyway, then slow it back down. Its good to get the blood flowing but don't abuse it too much, playing beyond your ability can hurt you and as steven said lead to sloppiness.

Get your speed down comfortably with all the exercises you can get your hands on, build on them slowly remaining consistent, push them from time to time to get your brain thinking but remember to always remain relaxed. And always mix them up with playing the fun stuff