#1
Just a quick question on the application of modes everyone.

Say you were playing in G Ionian and wanted to modulate to a Lydian scale. Would the more common thing be to play in C Lydian, shifting the tonal center but keeping the same notes as G Ionian, or would it be more common to go from G Ionian to G Lydian, sharping the fourth which would add a C# to the playing?

I apologize for any grammatical errors, I know that they can bug people. At least my spelling is strong!
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#2
well usually changing to the C lydian would be the more common however its whatever sounds good to you really
i know that satriani does that a bit with keeping the same tonic but then changing modes to make it more interesting

check out his vid on modes its brilliant:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=ZTQolymKmDA
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#3
I had Satriani in mind when writing this post lol. Anyway, that was what I thought, I just wanted some confirmation.
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#4
Dont try to think of you, the lead player, determining the mode.


Its all in the chords being played behind you
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#6
Quote by Teh GIR
Dont try to think of you, the lead player, determining the mode.


Its all in the chords being played behind you


I agree with GoDrex. I can freely modulate what I'm playing however I decide. I'd be willing to bet a pretty penny that Satriani also decides what mode he wants to use in his music.
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#7
Quote by liledman_76
well usually changing to the C lydian would be the more common however its whatever sounds good to you really
i know that satriani does that a bit with keeping the same tonic but then changing modes to make it more interesting

check out his vid on modes its brilliant:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=ZTQolymKmDA

No, changing from G Ionian to G Lydian would be much more common; going from parallel modes is more common than going between relative modes. It's easier because you don't have to change the underlying harmony and all you have to do is raise the fourth degree to obtain a Lydian scale. Trying to go from G Ionian to C Lydian would be much more awkward and difficult to do.

The idea you referred to is pitch axis theory, by the way.
#8
Yes but for example, if you, alone are playing a dorian, it will start to sound like its g ionian
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#9
Point taken. I agree that chords are needed to get the full effect of a mode.
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#11
I should have and being an 06er I ought ot have known better. Just wasnt paying attention
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