#1
so over the last quarter of school i played my roomates acoustic some, and now i have my own electric. I got a starcaster off amazon for 130 bucks. I know what your thinking, but its actaully a nice guitar and sounds damn nice hooked to my home theater speakers through my RP150.


first, the note pitch is changed depending on how hard a pres the fret, since the string stretches. how do i know how hard to press

I dont know what strings are on it, and i dont know how good they are. They seem really small though, the g string isnt wound. I was thinking of getting some thicker ones. Pretty much the main things i play are songs by the cure. I often find myself moving everyting up a string and over 5 (or 4) frets to get a nicer tone and Robert smith often uses a 6 string bass so i figure that i would get some thicker strings?

also i pick by using my thumb and pointer finger with some fingers on the pic guard, is this an acceptible method?
#2
your technique seems fine, your just anchoring (resting fingers) nothing wrong with that,

the notes dont change by how hard you press, and electric strings only have E A D wound.
strings done stretch...

acoustic strings are thicker in general i think.. or atleast usually very tight.

what guitar are you using?? something might be up with it.
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#3
Quote by nickmpower
so over the last quarter of school i played my roomates acoustic some, and now i have my own electric. I got a starcaster off amazon for 130 bucks. I know what your thinking, but its actaully a nice guitar and sounds damn nice hooked to my home theater speakers through my RP150.


first, the note pitch is changed depending on how hard a pres the fret, since the string stretches. how do i know how hard to press

I dont know what strings are on it, and i dont know how good they are. They seem really small though, the g string isnt wound. I was thinking of getting some thicker ones. Pretty much the main things i play are songs by the cure. I often find myself moving everyting up a string and over 5 (or 4) frets to get a nicer tone and Robert smith often uses a 6 string bass so i figure that i would get some thicker strings?

also i pick by using my thumb and pointer finger with some fingers on the pic guard, is this an acceptible method?


I honestly can't answer the first the first one.

2. It's your choice dude, but thicker strings will definitely affect the pitch. It'll (I think, not positive on this) give your playing a chunkier, more shred-like sound.

3. If picking that way is comfy for you then go for it, but as a beginner it'd probably be more benificial for you to learn on a pick and then experiment with different strumming methods after you get picking down.
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#4
is there a chance you have scalloped frets? you can change the pitch on a normal fretboard by adding extra pressure but you have to push hard, so maybe you have a scalloped fret board, you have to be really light on those.

Is the fretboard carved out slightly between frets? its a long shot but it would make some sense.

If you don't know what strings are on it I would suggest changin them anyway , 9's are good for beginners, either ernie ball or d'darrio 9 - 42.
#5
if you dont know what scalloped arecheck this pic.
http://www.warmoth.com/guitar/necks/necks.cfm?fuseaction=scalloping

btw, try to get a real amp. playing trough home teather speakers doesnt give you your sound and can damage your speakers. make a thread about it later.

idk what you mean with the 6 string bass thing. you want to put bass strigns on your guitar? thats a big phail. bass strings dont ift on a guitar. you could get 13 gauge strings, thats the thickest you can get (i think) or try to search for an octave down effect on your RP. thats the nearest you wil get to a bass sound.

and buy some picks. fingers are for classical guitar.
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#6
Quote by Snap017
I honestly can't answer the first the first one.

2. It's your choice dude, but thicker strings will definitely affect the pitch. It'll (I think, not positive on this) give your playing a chunkier, more shred-like sound.

3. If picking that way is comfy for you then go for it, but as a beginner it'd probably be more benificial for you to learn on a pick and then experiment with different strumming methods after you get picking down.



thinner strings will give a shreddier sound usually....but it is indeed chunky, which is why it is often used by rythm guitarists to get that big meaty sound.
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#7
Quote by Hale_91
the notes dont change by how hard you press, and electric strings only have E A D wound.
strings done stretch...
Strings stretch quite a lot.

I had the exact same problem as the TS when I bought my electric. I often pressed too hard on the strings, causing them to stretch and go slightly out of tune.

There are two solutions. You can either buy a set of thicker strings, or you can simply use a lighter touch. Don't press too hard on the strings. Just use enough pressure to make sure that the note rings clearly. This takes a lot of getting used to, especially when playing chords.

I simply upgraded to a set of 11s.
Quote by Haggard13
thinner strings will give a shreddier sound usually....but it is indeed chunky, which is why it is often used by rythm guitarists to get that big meaty sound.
I'm pretty sure thinner strings are preferred for soloing, and thicker strings for rhythm. That's why many guitarists buy a set of Skinny Top/Heavy Bottoms.
Last edited by leephan at Jul 19, 2008,
#8
It's probably got gauge 9's on it at the moment - you don't want to go any heavier until you've got to grips with the instrument and got a lot more strength in your fingers. Heavier strings would just make everything more difficult at this stage and that's no help to you at all.

If you want to transpose things up a few frets then just buy yourself a capo, they're only a few dollars....I'm not sure what you mean by the 6 string bass thing, a bass, even with 6 strings, sounds lower than a guitar. What it might be is that you're finding it a little easier to fret the strings correctly due to the softer feel of the strings further up the neck. It is harder to press strings down closer to the nut, and therefore harder to get them to sound correctly. Also, if you press down too hard then yes, the note will sound sharp, you just have to use your ears to tell you when you're doing it and find the correct fretting pressure for yourself.

The way you're picking isn't recommended to be honest, it's slow and awkward, not to mention potentially painful- the best thing to do is get some picks and start getting used to using them.
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#9
strings streatch when you use them, but not like, pressing into a fret raises the note, thats not possible..

playing the strings in stops them going out of tune though.
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#10
I meant i hold a pick with my pointer and thumb.

yes the pitch of the note changes if i press hard

and i actaully move stuff closer to the base of the guitar, so that every thing is being played on bigger strings, this seems to give a better sound for what im trying to play.

here is robert on the 6 string bass

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNBJ1rBAlN8
Last edited by nickmpower at Jul 19, 2008,
#11
Yes the pitch changes if you press hard, especially with jumbo frets. Press as light as you can while getting a clear tone. You can also compare the pitch on fret 5 with the next string played loose.
#12
Just press enough so that the string is touching the metal fret, you don't need to push it so hard that it sounds all sharp. Electric guitars need far less pressure than acoustic.

If you really feel you need thicker strings, go for it.. but you're not going to get a 6-string bass sound out of the guitar.
#13
I think what TS means about the bass thing is he wants a more bassy sound. TS try some heavier strings after you get used to playing. Also for a more bassy sound boost your lows and cut the treble a a little bit.

Edit: If you are sure that you want to keep that bassy sound you could buy a bass amp. The guitar won't break the amp and it gives a really smooth tone which I think is what you want.
#14
do you think a 6 string bass is a giant guitar??

because its not.. its tuned to BEADGC

and i have never changed a note on a guitar by pressing hard. theres like 2mm diff between the top and bottom of a fret, thats like, no give at all.
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#15
Quote by Hale_91
do you think a 6 string bass is a giant guitar??

because its not.. its tuned to BEADGC

and i have never changed a note on a guitar by pressing hard. theres like 2mm diff between the top and bottom of a fret, thats like, no give at all.
Well maybe that's because you didn't press too hard and/or because your strings weren't so light.

I've got extra jumbo frets on mine and when you press hard on the string, you can actually see it bend and there is a noticeable change in the pitch.
#16
i have extra jumbo, and have .09 on 2 guitar,s .1 on another, i would consider that fairly light.

i just tryed it, it does change, but minimally, and i had to press fairly hard to change it.

you only need to press hard enough for the note to let ring, its hardly any pressure at all
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#17
Quote by Hale_91
do you think a 6 string bass is a giant guitar??

because its not.. its tuned to BEADGC

and i have never changed a note on a guitar by pressing hard. theres like 2mm diff between the top and bottom of a fret, thats like, no give at all.


he uses a fender VI, which i believe is just like a guitar only and octave lower.

Im not playing the same tabs he does since i have to play it differently so that its the same octave
#18
so he uses a baritone?

a full octave is a long way though.. i have never heard of a guitar tuned to E2
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#19
Quote by nickmpower
he uses a fender VI, which i believe is just like a guitar only and octave lower.

Im not playing the same tabs he does since i have to play it differently so that its the same octave

In that case just play things normally but use the octave or pitch shift effect on the RP150 to drop everything an octave - thicker strings aren't going to help you with this.

I's advise trying to learn some more conventional stuff as well though - the guitar is difficult enough to get to grips at the beginning with without complicating the issue with odd tunings and suchlike.
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#20
I dont need to drop everything an octave, i just need a thicker sound i guess.
#21
Quote by nickmpower
I dont need to drop everything an octave, i just need a thicker sound i guess.

Yes, you do - the guitar Robert Smith is playing is tuned an octave down, is it not?

You don't need a "thicker" sound, you need to be playing in the correct octave.
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#22
playing an octave higher would make you sound "thinner", which i think is your problem
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#23
naw, im palying on the same octave, i have a cure tab book and its tabbed for guitar. on the 6 string bass he plays a couple strings higher and over like 2 or 3 frets depending