#1
sincs the summer hoildays have started here in the uk for me i have the next 6 weeks of nothing to do so i have decided to start practicing both of these instuments (guitar,bass) for 8 hours a day

here is my planned practice for guitar

10 minutes- warming up
1 hour -chord revision ,practise and composition
1 hour- scales and modes (fully understanding the pentatonic and the harmonic minor)
2 hours - technique practise( legato, slide, hybrid picking, two handded tapping)
2 hours shred study (speed and accuracy especialy)
1 hour- blues or country study
1 hour - learning song of choice

planned practice for bass

10 minutes- warming up
1 hour -scales and modes
2 hours technique practice (legato, slide, hybrid picking, two handded tapping)
3 hours bass shred - looking at the techniques of players like john myung, cliff burton, timmy c, ect
2 hours song study- learning song(s) of choice

btw i am aware of learning theory and read sheet music and that will be fitted in where i can also if anyone would like to offer advice tips please do
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#2
That's a lot of ****ing practice.

Good luck.
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#3
Honestly i dont think you need to practice this long. Why not just wokr on what you're having trouble on for a little while say 3 or 4 hours that way you dont burn out.
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#4
good luck with it, but most people couldn't keep that up for to long
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#8
finding 16 hours a day to practice is difficult enough, but then actually sticking to it, yeah right.
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#9
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crisp fiver says you wont do a third of that daily.

I'll put down an andrew jackson that he wont do a fourth of that daily.
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#10
I think that there is a good chance of injury from that type of practice regimine. It would be no different that typing 16 hours per day and playing guitar and bass creates a lot more tension in the hand joints than typing does. You are going to run the risk of getting tendonitis, carpal tunnel, bursitis and many other repetative motion ailments.
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#12
Quote by shredder.cheese
I think that there is a good chance of injury from that type of practice regimine. It would be no different that typing 16 hours per day and playing guitar and bass creates a lot more tension in the hand joints than typing does. You are going to run the risk of getting tendonitis, carpal tunnel, bursitis and many other repetative motion ailments.

+1. Thank you.

Like any part of your your body, if you overwork your hand and arm muscles and don't rest properly, you're just going to wind up hurting yourself.
#14
bad idea,
read shredder cheese's post, hes right
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#15
Hey,
This is my first post here, though I've been reading for a while.
Anyway, about the 16 hr practice plan - it probably isn't a good idea to play that much. Like the others said, that will result in injury - you're tendons just aren't designed to take that kind of beating.
Second, here's the thing - we are all really lucky to have a passion for this instrument. It is a wonderful thing. If you play that much, you will wind up hating it. Trust me about this!(I've been up to 10-12 hrs/day for stretches in the past, and had the same result).
I'd stick with 3 or 4 hours a day, maybe 6 on occasion but never more than that. Take a day off now and again to recharge. Also, be sure to cycle through different kinds of practice. Like one day working on exercises to build your dexterity, working on scales, runs, chromatics and such, another day improvising and coming up with your own stuff, another working on learning songs by others. The different kinds of practice feed each other.
Anyway, good luck and enjoy your guitar playing summer!
-Harry
#16
well, everybody is right. its just like working out. if you keep doing the same thing, u get tired of it and quit and/or hurt yourself. plus 16 hours is a ****ing long time. you would need to wake up at 7:00 start playing and not stop until 11:00. and that is without a single break. i couldnt do anything for that long. just think about that. but good luck anyway. and enjoy ur summer. mines only 19 days from being over and it sucks!
#17
Trust me, dude.


I have tried a routine like that for 1 month are so and it is not good.The only difference between your routine and mine was it was a all day routine about 13 hours or so on guitar.I stopped doing it because it made me tried, bored, and lose interest in guitar.After I stop doing I have been more happier and thankful I did it.I now play what ever I want and sometimes do bits of the routine.
#18
16 hours is just overworking yourself. I would say 3 hours maximum for each instrument daily, 6 hours maximum if you're doing just one instrument a day. Occasionally, if you feel it's absolutely necessary, 10 hours practice every fortnight. There's only so much you can do to improve, if you overplay you'll burn out severely, you'll overwork your muscles and your playing won't improve as fast as if you were practicing for half that long.
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#19
1. Cut practice time by at least 6 hours.
2. Practice improvisation during your practice time. You seem to be overlooking that.
#21
It also looks to me as though you don't really have a definite plan. You have things like "shred study" or "blues/country" but no specific ideas. You're going to have to develop the planning a bit more.
#22
terrible idea, ask yourself why you play guitar
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#23
Quote by Edgeless
sincs the summer hoildays have started here in the uk for me i have the next 6 weeks of nothing to do so i have decided to start practicing both of these instuments (guitar,bass) for 8 hours a day

here is my planned practice for guitar

10 minutes- warming up
1 hour -chord revision ,practise and composition
1 hour- scales and modes (fully understanding the pentatonic and the harmonic minor)
2 hours - technique practise( legato, slide, hybrid picking, two handded tapping)
2 hours shred study (speed and accuracy especialy)
1 hour- blues or country study
1 hour - learning song of choice

planned practice for bass

10 minutes- warming up
1 hour -scales and modes
2 hours technique practice (legato, slide, hybrid picking, two handded tapping)
3 hours bass shred - looking at the techniques of players like john myung, cliff burton, timmy c, ect
2 hours song study- learning song(s) of choice

btw i am aware of learning theory and read sheet music and that will be fitted in where i can also if anyone would like to offer advice tips please do


Alright, here's my idea, combine some of this stuff.

2 hours for technique practice, followed by 2 hours of shred practice? Really, the two should be one in the same, not two totally different studies. So that takes out 2 hours. At the same time, almost all of blues and country is either chord work or a solo of some form, almost always improvised. So, chop that out and free up another hour to devote to improvisation/ear training.

There's also no need to practice on the bass as though it was a totally unrelated instrument. Scales and modes don't really change. So, chop out 1 hour for scales and moded, that's just redundant. The same goes for technique and bass shred, the two are one in the same, and not totally unrelated to guitar practice for the same thing, so chop that down to an hour, and make it for application of guitar based training to the bass.

Now, time to cut some of those times down. 1 hour for chord work and composition seems very excessive to me, cut it down to 20-30 minutes. 2 hours for technique is also very excessive, how about another 30-45 minutes. As far as bass, like I said, treat it as more or less the same instrument (don't flame, I know it's different in many ways), learn to apply what you know to the bass, and work on some more bass specific techniques, i.e. slapping. Do that for another ~30 mins. Now, instead of allocating three hours to studying songs, try this: pick out a song, try to figure out the bassline, if you can't, look up the tab, then try to figure out the guitar, if you can't, look up the tab. Work that song until you can play it fairly well, and move on to another, then come back and work it a little more the next day. Do that for anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour, as time permits. Finally, for improvisation, write a bass-line, and then write a guitar part to go over the top. Just come up with one "song" a day.

I think something like that would work much better, and you could be done in 2 hours or less. 16 hours a day is more than ridiculous, it's just plain stupid (pardon the harshness). If you try to do your routine, you will be ready to set your guitar on fire and run your head through a garbage disposal. The thing is that there is an upper limit to everything. Your brain needs time NOT spent playing to learn and make connections, your muscles and tendons need time off to heal. Contrary to popular belief, you do grow when you're not playing guitar. The best way to figure out how to practice guitar is to combine weight-lifting and school. If you lift weights intensively every day, and always train the same muscles, you'll basically wither away. If you studied the same thing every day, with no real goal, you'd never learn.

Don't think that time spent equals skill. Everyone hears of their guitar heroes practicing for hours and hours every day, what they don't realize is what many of these people cut out of their lives, and how many people do the same thing and get NOWHERE. For every guitar player that plays for 10 hours a day and gets famous, there's 10,000 that work at Wal-Mart until they're dead.

You need to face a little bit of reality, sure, it's nice to devote crazy amounts of time into guitar, but you need to put on your business hat every once in a while, there's no guarantee guitar will support you in life. You need to develop other skills as well.

If you are dead serious about practicing this much, you need to get much more specific in your training, with a routine this vague you're going to spin your tires as much or more than you're gonna move forward. That's the difference, what you do in your practice. Practice is very much quality over quantity, 2 well spent hours is much better than 8 random pointless hours.

Find a piece of paper, write out CLEAR, SPECIFIC, ATTAINABLE, SHORT-TERM goals. I don't care if it's something you could do in one day, I don't care if it's something you've even ALREADY DONE. Then, make a list of your dreams, they need to be almost FANTASTICAL and LONG-TERM but still CLEAR AND SPECIFIC. There's your road map, look at how your short-term goals can lead you to your long-term goals.

Remember, there's always more than one way to get somewhere, but it's much easier to get there if you know where you're at and where you're going, and what stuff you'll probably have to do along the way, as opposed to just wandering around until you stumble upon it.
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#24
I think after a while, practice would become forced and you would begin to hate the instrument. Someone probably mentioned that already. Don't just play to get good.
#27
Quote by NickoAbate
planned practicing never works


fail.


properly planned practicing is always a good thing, just keep it realistic.
#29
Quote by TheShred201
He also left out ear training.

I kinda noticed that too. Ear training is very important when improvising or writing music (you can hear the music in your head and you can it apply to the guitar).

I suggest the TS to spend some time on ear training, transcribing music and maybe sightreading.
#30
Quote by se012101

Second, here's the thing - we are all really lucky to have a passion for this instrument. It is a wonderful thing. If you play that much, you will wind up hating it. Trust me about this!(I've been up to 10-12 hrs/day for stretches in the past, and had the same result).


Yup, experienced that myself. I played so much in the last 2 months that I hated my guitar tone, and I hated anything guitar because I couldn't create anything new[like riffs and whatnot].

Stopped playing and doing some house construction and went back to playing guitar and now it sounds so beautiful to me. So it's not just playing that long makes you hate playing, your ears will get overdone and you'll start searching for a tone that's not there, because the tone you want doesn't exist.
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#31
Honestly i dont think you need to practice this long. Why not just wokr on what you're having trouble on for a little while say 3 or 4 hours that way you dont burn out.

yeah, take brakes. and make sure to keep doing enough stuff that is fun for you so you feel like playing all the time.
He also left out ear training.

yeah, he has a REALLY good point.
good luck, hope it works out for you
#32
You're taking a too big bite in a too little time.

I'd suggest u just to pick a day for learning modes, another day for scaled, another for modes etc. and when you get bored, just jam something. Guitar playing is about having fun and learning new things, not torturing urself.
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#34
Paganini did 15 hours a day with no ill-effects.

Then again, he was the greatest violinist of his age. (and a ridiculously good guitarist)

That said, I would recommend halving that amount of practice, and focusing on smaller areas. With intense practice, depth, not breadth, will help you more. I would break that practice down to perhaps 4 areas, an hour for each. Or two hours for your top priority, and then 1 hour for the others. And then a bit of messing around each day.

Good luck.
#35
I used to practice nearly 7 hours daily, I can't say it did me all that much good. I practiced all the things I was supposed to and developed very solid technique, but after about a year of it started to turn me off the guitar. I became too focused on the end results, and I wasn't really enjoying the process anymore. If you don't enjoy playing, it will have a detrimental effect on your playing, as it did on mine.

Thankfully, I'm back in a place where I just love to play the guitar. Learn to love learning.
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