#1
...about chord sequences.

The Beatles were amazing song writers and alot of their magic came from their particular choice of chords and how it complimented the lyrics and voice.

I'd like to know about the theory behind contructing chord sequences, like using "pivot" chords and stuff like that.

If anybdoy could explain to me then I'd really appreciate it!
#2
The best way to start learning about chord progressions is to learn how to construct chords from the major scale and learn what function each one has in a progression. Read this lesson for more information.
#4
Quote by Eirien
The best way to start learning about chord progressions is to learn how to construct chords from the major scale and learn what function each one has in a progression. Read this lesson for more information.


+1

Learn the formulas of which scale tones create which chords and how they can relate to each other. Once you know about that kind of stuff you can begin to experiment and make your own progressions.
█████████████████████████████████████████████
█████████████████████████████████████████████
Portugal. The Man »–
#5
Quote by FreedomFighter
...about chord sequences.

The Beatles were amazing song writers and alot of their magic came from their particular choice of chords and how it complimented the lyrics and voice.

I'd like to know about the theory behind contructing chord sequences, like using "pivot" chords and stuff like that.

If anybdoy could explain to me then I'd really appreciate it!

What concepts of theory are you already familiar with?
#6
That is an extremely complex subject. Your best bet would be to learn to read music and pick up a textbook on the subject, like Piston's Harmony.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
I hardly know anything. Well, I know some scales, pentatonic, and being in a band and a song writer, I have a fairly decent ear for melody. But other than that, nadda, zilch.
#10
Quote by FreedomFighter
Nope. I know nothing of them sorry.

Then that's a good place to start. Some theory lessons on UG are good (like the one in BGC's sig), and I'd also recommend the book The Complete Idiot's Guide To Music Theory.

Learn the theory behind the major scale as a start and you'll be well on your way.
#12
Quote by FreedomFighter
Okay. Excellent, thank you!

You're welcome.

Think of it like a building; if you create a solid foundation for knowledge then it'll be easier to throw the more advanced concepts on top.
#13
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#14
Quote by Ændy

I swear by that lesson. I learned a LOT from it. I remember not knowing what tapping was or what intervals are and I went to that lesson for musical guidance.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥