#1
I just finished installing these pickups on an Ibanez RG320:
Seymour Duncan SH-13 (bridge)
Seymour Duncan SH-1n '59 (neck)

The guitar has a 5-way switch, one tone pot and one volume pot.

Here's what my setup currently resembles:


The black cable circled in red is from the SH-13. As far as I can tell, the black wire is hot, white and red are the poles, and bare and green are ground.
The metal shielded cable circled in red (and in green) is from the SH-1. This one threw me off my original plan a bit since it's a single conductor pickup - and I had to do some reading as to how I was going to install it.

Right now my setup seems to work like so:
5-way Switch -
position 1: bridge
position 2: noisy neck
position 3: noisy bridge
position 4: a bit less noisy neck
position 5: nothing.

My switch positions are all wonky, because, well because I don't quite understand what to do with the single conductor pickup. (Also, I can't find any source explaining the switch positions and which circuits they engage.)

For now I'd be happy to at least be able to use the bridge and the neck pickup separately in a relatively not noisy fashion.

I'd also like to mention that I have not touched any of the wire connecting the switch to the pots. I just desoldered and removed the old pickups and used that same type of configuration.

I have no idea why the SH-1 is coming out so noisily. Anyone have any suggestions?
#2
When did this start happening?

I noticed a minor fluctuation in the time vortex at around 11pm GMT last night, which could have thrown the magnetic flux off. I would suggest cleansing the guitar in a temporal cascade, then perhaps time-locking the control cavity, to prevent further problems.

Well, that's how we do it on Gallifrey, anyway.
#3
I see.
I hadn't thought of it that way.

Where was the geolocation - precisely - of the temporal fluctuation? I hope my flux capacitor didn't get recalibrated because of the cascade stream.

- Seriously, it started happening right when I installed them :P
#4
From the wiring, it looks like your switch includes splitting options.

If you've installed a three-connector pickup (north start and finish, and ground), you'll need to use a three-way switch with the other pickup's north finish and south start either soldered together, or on a DPDT.

Have a look at this diagram:


For the 5-connector pickup, wire it as per the diagram. For the 3-connector pickup, wire as per the diagram, but solder a piece of wire between the pole for the hot, and the pole that should have the north finish & south start.

The result should be:

1. Bridge
2. Neck and bridge
3. Neck
4. Bridge and neck
5. Bridge split
Last edited by -MintSauce- at Jul 20, 2008,
#5
Quote by -MintSauce-
From the wiring, it looks like your switch includes splitting options.

If you've installed a three-connector pickup (north start and finish, and ground), you'll need to use a three-way switch with the other pickup's north finish and south start either soldered together, or on a DPDT.

Have a look at this diagram:

For the 5-connector pickup, wire it as per the diagram. For the 3-connector pickup, wire as per the diagram, but solder a piece of wire between the pole for the hot, and the pole that should have the north finish & south start.

The result should be:

1. Bridge
2. Neck and bridge
3. Neck
4. Bridge and neck
5. Bridge split


Bleh - the internet ate my post.

There is one problem that I can see. As per the diagram, (and my limited understanding,) single conductor pickups cannot be split. My neck pickup (SH-1 '59) is a single conductor.

I'm not entirely certain how to actually solder that to the 5way switch so that I can at least have it work by itself.

Right now it seems to semi-work, position 2 and 4 on my switch activate it, but it's quite noisy (hum) and seems hollow. (Plus, I'm not certain why, and it bothers me a lot.)

I've been told that it's possible that I need to peel a bit more of the metal shielding, and that it might reduce/cut the humming altogether.

However, my wiring scheme could probably be optimized.

In essence, all I really need/want is:
1. Bridge
2. Bridge & Neck
3. Neck

Anything more is nice, but not required.

Also, thank you very much for your detailed reply - I appreciate it much.

EDIT Additional info

This is IBANEZ' original wiring:


And here's how I have mine set up at the very moment (WHICH DOESN'T WORK!):
Last edited by Syralid at Jul 21, 2008,
#6
So you just want it 2 be a 2 humbucker with no coilsplit then. Seymores site should have a diagram to show how to make the bridge pickup into basically a 2 conductor set up. Then it would be:
1 neck
2 neck/bridge
3 bridge
4 bridge
5 nothing or kill
Its the way I have my 2 pickup strat with a regular 5 way switch wired. The aftermarket better 3 way wont fit in the cavity without making the cavity deeper. Not sure how the internal connections are made on the ibanez switch. The cheap fender style is the 2 center pins are soldered together with the lead running to the volume. The 3 pins on 1 side are connected to each pickup. And the 3 pins on the other side are used for the 2 tone controls. depending on which pickup you want controlled.
#7
Quote by Tackleberry
So you just want it 2 be a 2 humbucker with no coilsplit then. Seymores site should have a diagram to show how to make the bridge pickup into basically a 2 conductor set up. Then it would be:
1 neck
2 neck/bridge
3 bridge
4 bridge
5 nothing or kill
Its the way I have my 2 pickup strat with a regular 5 way switch wired. The aftermarket better 3 way wont fit in the cavity without making the cavity deeper. Not sure how the internal connections are made on the ibanez switch. The cheap fender style is the 2 center pins are soldered together with the lead running to the volume. The 3 pins on 1 side are connected to each pickup. And the 3 pins on the other side are used for the 2 tone controls. depending on which pickup you want controlled.


Yes, I believe that soldering the WHITE and RED wires together basically turns the SH-13 into a 2 conductor.

That still leaves me a bit confused as to where I want to connect the wires to the switch.