#1
Important note: I'm not looking for a treble booster, so theres no need to suggest which pedals i should get

I'm just confused because i seem to have visualised 2 different definitions as to what a treble booster is:

1. A pedal which has a boost in the very high frequencies which adds some sparkle to dark voiced amplifiers like the old "non top boost" AC30s.

2. A pedal which adds more boost to the signal based on the pitch of the note you are playing - it will add more of a boost the higher the note you play on the guitar, to act as a kind of automatic solo boost.

Which of these is correct? or is the 2nd one just a silly thing i've thought up?
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#3
ah ok..

i don't see where i got the 2nd idea from then hehe.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#4
Actually, your second one is kind of correct. The first idea is absolutely correct, but the second one just needs a little tweaking. I think where you get mixed up is when you thought that it boosts the note based on what you're playing. A treble booster couldn't care less what note you play, all it does is amplify your signal.
BUT it amplifies your signal in such a way that it adds (IIRC) 3 decibels of boost per octave, starting at a specified point. So when you play a higher note, it's louder. Not because the booster sees the note and then says, "ok, let's make this one louder," but because the boost is more effective at higher frequencies.
A good way to think about it is this:
Many treble boosters have an option for a flat boost and a mid boost. All that switch does is change how effective the boost is at different frequencies. The mid boost setting just takes the peak and moves it from the treble to the mid frequencies. The full boost setting removes the "spike" and just boosts everything across the board evenly.
#5
Quote by Roc8995
Actually, your second one is kind of correct. The first idea is absolutely correct, but the second one just needs a little tweaking. I think where you get mixed up is when you thought that it boosts the note based on what you're playing. A treble booster couldn't care less what note you play, all it does is amplify your signal.
BUT it amplifies your signal in such a way that it adds (IIRC) 3 decibels of boost per octave, starting at a specified point. So when you play a higher note, it's louder. Not because the booster sees the note and then says, "ok, let's make this one louder," but because the boost is more effective at higher frequencies.
A good way to think about it is this:
Many treble boosters have an option for a flat boost and a mid boost. All that switch does is change how effective the boost is at different frequencies. The mid boost setting just takes the peak and moves it from the treble to the mid frequencies. The full boost setting removes the "spike" and just boosts everything across the board evenly.

ok thanks, thats cleared it up for me.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.