#1
When I am playing, sometimes my pick seems like it's actually jumping on the strings rather than hitting them. Sorta like my strings are ramps and my pick is a car. It makes my alternate picking really unaccurate.

Now, trust me on this, it feels horrible. It doesn't hurt or anything, but it just feels weird. So, what could this be? I know I tilt the point of my pick toward the headstock quite a bit.
#2
if u refine ur picking motion to just enough movement to hit the strings that jumpy feeling may become smaller or unnoticable.remember distance equals time so keep ur pick as close to the strings as possible.I think the jumping feeling is kind of natural because the pick has to go across the strings and back to pick the next note so I think its only natural to feel a slight jump,by the way how long have u been playing?
#3
Also you need to keep you pick parallel to the strings and only angle it when you are doing pinch harmonics (and maybe a slight angle when you sweep pick).
Attachments:
holding pick.jpg
Quote by dale-banez

my gear:
oh wait, no one cares

Quote by uncboy19
man all guitars are female. if they werent you couldn't make sweet love to them with your fingers. ok somebody better quote that ****. thats like quantum guitar **** rite there.
Last edited by shredder.cheese at Jul 20, 2008,
#4
the choice of the angle depends on what your intending to play if its shred or anything decently fast 90% of the guys in this forum or going to tell u to angle your pick slightly but that is entirely up to you but i find that if I pick parallel to the strings my pick jumps more and gets hung on the strings,so my advice is experiment with the angle and find what feels best to you.
#5
Quote by Metal Society
the choice of the angle depends on what your intending to play if its shred or anything decently fast 90% of the guys in this forum or going to tell u to angle your pick slightly but that is entirely up to you but i find that if I pick parallel to the strings my pick jumps more and gets hung on the strings,so my advice is experiment with the angle and find what feels best to you.



If your pick is getting hung up on the strings when you keep it parallel then you are using more of the flat part of the pick instead of the tip. The tip should be the only part of the pick coming in contact with the strings and that it why most shredders (including myself) switch to Jazz III picks because there is more of a point on it.
Quote by dale-banez

my gear:
oh wait, no one cares

Quote by uncboy19
man all guitars are female. if they werent you couldn't make sweet love to them with your fingers. ok somebody better quote that ****. thats like quantum guitar **** rite there.
#6
Quote by shredder.cheese
Also you need to keep you pick parallel to the strings and only angle it when you are doing pinch harmonics (and maybe a slight angle when you sweep pick).


I don't think you are understanding what KIND of an angle I am putting on the pick.

Here's a pic of what I'm talking about...
Last edited by The.new.guy at Jul 20, 2008,
#7
It looks like you are angling the pick (as you said in the first post) with the point kind of pointing towards the head stock and the point of the pick as well as part of the edge contacts the string. Think of it this way, the more the pick contacts the string the slower it will be to disconnect and the more jumpy it will feel. Try just to have the point (about 1/16") make contact. Try just doing tremolo picking on one note to get the correct contact amount and go faster and faster and keep the contact even. Then go to alternate picking trying to achieve that same feel.
Quote by dale-banez

my gear:
oh wait, no one cares

Quote by uncboy19
man all guitars are female. if they werent you couldn't make sweet love to them with your fingers. ok somebody better quote that ****. thats like quantum guitar **** rite there.
#8
I'd like to talk about pick angle. I think a different angle all together could apply here and help the situation.

Most guitar players angle their pick the same way. And this is with the pick fpat agains the thumb print and then on the side of the index finger. This places the index finger closer to the bridge of the guitar. Got me so far? What I am going to propose to you is to try the exact opposite. Try putting the pick on the end of your thumb and held there with the fingerprint of the index finger. Now this, in contrast, puts your index finger closer to the neck.

I learned this from a jazz player back in the '70s. He was and still is the fastest player I know. He says this position puts your hand at the most relaxed position. I believe it also creates a better tone. It also sets your forearm in a better relazed position.

The cool thing about learning to play this way, is that it gives you a totally different option, even if you decide you don't want to play like this all the time. I do, and when I want a brighter tone, or pinch harmonics, I simply move my pick into a different angle.

Just my 2 cents. Hope it helps.

Vinni Smith
You don't need a different guitar.
You just need a different guitar pick!

www.v-picks.com
#9
Quote by Metal Society
the choice of the angle depends on what your intending to play if its shred or anything decently fast 90% of the guys in this forum or going to tell u to angle your pick slightly but that is entirely up to you but i find that if I pick parallel to the strings my pick jumps more and gets hung on the strings,so my advice is experiment with the angle and find what feels best to you.

Agreed. You have to do whats comfortable for you.

Also if you are playing sloppy you already made the mistake of poor practice technique. If its bad and sloppy you shouldnt be playing at that speed yet. You need to fix your practice routine. Slow way the **** down pick without tension then slowly work your way back up. Don't play sloppy slow down to speeds that are clean and tension free. If that means your playing super slow then so be it. It takes time you obviosuly got ahead of yourself and are rushing your progress if you have a problem like this. Take it easy man learn good technique and play right or else you will have to relearn everything in a few months.
#10
I doubt it's a pick angle issue. Either angled or flat pick can work depending on
the sound you want to get.

Here's something I think a lot of people overlook: when you make contact with
the string, not only do you apply a force to the string to pick it, but the string
applies a force BACK. It's the latter the gives the problems. If it's not handled
you're picking will be tense, your pick gets "caught", you lose control of the pick ....
Relax and allow some "give" when the pick hits the string, then follow through to
pick. This all happens in the blink of an eye, but that's the general idea.
#11
Quote by edg

Relax and allow some "give" when the pick hits the string, then follow through to
pick. This all happens in the blink of an eye, but that's the general idea.


Hmmm...I've heard that a lot from you. It seems to be something like your signature line? Anyways, in the 5 or so times I've seen it from one of your posts, I've never understood it. However, somehow, the way you explained it right there made everything just click! Thanks a TON! Not only for the times before, but for this one and the many ones to come!

Just to be sure, I should relax and allow my pick to flop over the string? Not a lot of "flop" but enough, right? Well, sadly, I haven't had much sleep in the past few nights. See there this girl that I met the other day and I...well thats going off subject.

Anyways, thanks again!
#12
Quote by The.new.guy
Hmmm...I've heard that a lot from you. It seems to be something like your signature line?


LOL. Well, maybe it's because it's you that keeps asking. I dunno...

First of all, I was responding to the pick angle comments -- I don't think it's really
the issue. The main issue is to be always in control of the pick before, during and
after you pick. I think for many people, where it goes wrong, is that initial contact.

"flopping" -- that might sort of describe it. There's a few areas where you could
control the back force -- arm, wrist, fingers and/or pick grip. Try experimenting.

Something I've also heard pros say (and which I've mentioned several times too),
is "play from the string". Which is basically another way of saying, how you react to
the string is important. How you react to them, in turn, will actually completely
change how you percieve them. Someone who's "playing from the string" will
feel like the strings are rubbery, forgiving and the pick glides over them. Someone
who's not, feels the strings as hard and unyielding, requiring force to get the pick
through. Because they're fighting the strings, most contact with them will cause
loss of control. It's actually quite amazing how different the string can feel to you
even though absolutely nothing about the string changes. You need to change in
relation to the string.
#13
Quote by edg
LOL. Well, maybe it's because it's you that keeps asking. I dunno...


Well, actually, it is me that keeps asking. I've had TONS of threads about picking on multiple websites. I'm not sure if I wasn't really taking the advice, or if I just thought that I was when, really, I wasn't doing what they said to try.

Anyways, thanks, it's weird how little things make a BIG difference.