#1
I just bought a used Bad Monkey to try out. It won't click on with the power supply plugged in but a signal will go through if it's bypassed. I tried a 9v power supply I have and hooking it into the daisy chain power supply for my Boss pedals. The pedal will not work on either. It will work with a battery but it seems like the led isn't very bright compared to my Boss pedals but it seems to work fine.

The bottom of the pedal lists the Harman Power Supply PS200R supply. The only difference is the current - it recommends 300 mA.

Will that make that much of a difference or is the pedal just messed up?

sd
#2
Well I think it might not work if you run a power supply while the batteries are in. Try a new battery (maybe your battery's just dead) alone and then the power supply alone.
#3
I tried the power supply without a battery first. It works with a battery (it just seems the led isn't nearly as bright as it is in my Boss pedals, same battery). In most other pedals, the power supply overrides the battery anyway.

I'm just wondering if using a 200mA 9v instead of a 300mA 9v power supply makes that much of a difference or if the power supply input (or something else in the pedal) is bad.

sd
#4
Quote by southdeltan

I'm just wondering if using a 200mA 9v instead of a 300mA 9v power supply makes that much of a difference or if the power supply input (or something else in the pedal) is bad.

sd

The pedal won't work correctly if it doesn't get the mA it needs. When choosing power supplies, remember: Voltage needs to match, and you need at LEAST as much mA as the pedal needs. More is ok, since it'll just take as much as it needs, but you need at least the minimum amount (it's probably said in the manual or something).
Quote by Lunchbox362
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#5
Ok, thanks. I'll have to look around and see if I or one of my bandmates has a 9v 300mA power supply.

How much current does a standard 9v battery produce?

On another note, if you have an 18v power supply and a daisy chain splitter, can that be used to safely power 9v pedals? It's an 18v for some Danelectro pedal but it will power up several Boss pedals if you hook them into it. I haven't used it because I'm afraid it'll fry something. Will that change the voltage?

sd
#6
I have the Bad Monkey and work with a 9v 300mA power supply.
Besides being a guitar player, I'm a big fan of the guitar. I love that damn instrument. Steve Vai

Gear:
Kramer Striker FR422SM
Roland Microcube
Digitech Bad Monkey
Dunlop Tortex 1.14mm picks


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#7
Well I think the pedal isn't getting enough power.Cause the Digitech LED lights are very strong and brighter than Boss pedals.
My pedals:
Dunlop Cry Baby Wah GCB-95
Ibanez Tube Screamer (TS-9)
Digitech Hot Head
MXR Phase 90
Digitech DigiDelay
#8
Quote by southdeltan

On another note, if you have an 18v power supply and a daisy chain splitter, can that be used to safely power 9v pedals? It's an 18v for some Danelectro pedal but it will power up several Boss pedals if you hook them into it. I haven't used it because I'm afraid it'll fry something. Will that change the voltage?

sd

No, I don't think it would. I suggest you don't try it, it might fry your pedal.
Quote by southdeltan

How much current does a standard 9v battery produce?

I think batteries don't as much produce current, as have it stored in them - rechargeable batteries give numbers in mAh which is basically how much current it has in it (I think it's the same kind of thing for normal batteries, they just don't tell the numbers). For example, 2200mAh means that the battery will give out 2200mA for one hour - or 300mA for 7.3 hours. I have no idea how much mAh those big 9v batteries that pedals use have, but the small ones (that you use in cameras and clocks and such) usually have 2000+. Anyway, you don't really have to worry about how much they have.

(please correct me if I'm wrong here)
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