#1
I'm browsing some amps to go along with an Epi Les Paul that I'm planning to buy next week. I was set on getting an Cube 30 but after hearing some tube amps on youtube I've really started to consider them. Side to side the cube seems to sound very digital. I've been eyeing the AD30VT and Peavey Valveking/Classic 30

For a beginner, would it be a better choice to go with the cube mainly for the versatility and no having to hassle with pedals and amp accessories I'd have to get with a tube amp? Also, I'm using it mainly for personal practice and maybe the occasional jam with friends. No gigging and it doesn't need to be loud enough to overpower drums or anything like that.

One of my other concerns is maintenance for tube amps. Is it a problem?

I play mostly classic rock, metal but I like to have some good cleans for blues that I play as well.

Thanks!
#2
I'd go with the AD30 as your first amplifier. You need to be able to expose yourself to the most sounds available, the AD30 has a lot of effects, amp models, etc. built in and the Vox hybrids do not sound too bad either.

Tube amps require more care than a solid state, but are not really that much of a hassle. I would still pick the SS because of its versatility, and in the end, if you're a beginner, you will not be able to appreciate the dynamics of a tube amp anyway. Hell, half the players who play tube amps have no idea why they use them other than that they heard they were better than solid state.
#4
Quote by i_am_metalhead
If you can afford it then by all means get a tube amp!


+1 Money talks.
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#5
LOL get a solid state, as a beginner you shouldn't have to worry about all the problems and hassles of a tube amp, and instead work on playing your guitar, it shouldn't matter what kind of amp you have until you are decent at playing guitar.

EDIT: Probably the only situation I would ever recommend anyone a solid state amp.
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#6
listen to DSchmitty. just do it.
Quote by dcdossett65
Life is too short to worry about this crap.

Who.

Cares.
#7
Yeah, a small SS for now and then start saving up, that way when you feel you are exerienced enough to go tubed, you would be able to afford it with ease. The dynamics and details of playing will come in time, so starting with a smaller SS would be okay, but you will want something better as your playing improves.
#8
The AD30VT is not a tube amp btw, not sure if you were implying that it was or not. It has *a* tube, but it's not a tube amp by any means.

If you need a lot of versatility, I'd probably go with a SS for now. But since it seems like you can afford it, I'd probably go for a Classic 30, then buy an OD if you need more gain.

However, the Cube or Vox will give you built in effects and once you upgrade you'll appreciate your amp much more as it'll sound a lot better. Not that the Cube and Vox don't sound good, but the Classic 30 sounds much better
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#9
I think there are good solid state, digital, and tube amps in a variety of budgets. I would say set your budget first then see what you can afford. At a really low budget, like $200 USD and under you're mst likely find better tube amps than anything else. For slightly more there are some great solid state amps from Tech 21 and Fender as well as good tube amps from Crate and Peavey.
#10
Quote by DSchmitty
LOL get a solid state, as a beginner you shouldn't have to worry about all the problems and hassles of a tube amp, and instead work on playing your guitar, it shouldn't matter what kind of amp you have until you are decent at playing guitar.

EDIT: Probably the only situation I would ever recommend anyone a solid state amp.


Problems and hassle?? What are the problems and hassle of a tube amp because I don't have any!

Don't listen to these people telling you to get a solid state because a few months down the road they will all be saying "Dude... get a new amp!!!". Save yourself the the and the money (that you would waste on an SS) and get yourself a Peavey Valve King.
#11
Quote by DSchmitty
LOL get a solid state, as a beginner you shouldn't have to worry about all the problems and hassles of a tube amp, and instead work on playing your guitar, it shouldn't matter what kind of amp you have until you are decent at playing guitar.

EDIT: Probably the only situation I would ever recommend anyone a solid state amp.



I gotta disagree here also. A small tube amp and 1 or 2 pedals is alot less complicated then an SS amp with all it's bells and whistles. i was overwhelmed by my transtube when i first started playing. i finally ended up setting all the dials at 12 o'clock and didn't move anything but the volume control for about a year.
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Dean V-Wing
Dean ML 79 SilverBurst
MXR M 108
H2O Chorus/Echo
Valve Junior (V3 Head/Cab and Combo)
VHT Special 6
Phonic 620 Power Pod PA
Wampler Super Plextortion
Line 6 Pod HD
#12
i would say get a classic 30.

by the time you actually need all tubes and have to "deal with all the issues of a tube amp" you'll be experienced enough as a guitarist

i bought a squier strat pack and within a year i upgraded to the guitar and amp i have now because i was so sick of the sound coming from my amp. it was awful. if you can afford good equipment get it

07 Fender American Deluxe Strat
07 Fender Custom Telecaster
09 Seymour Duncan Pickup Booster
09 Fulltone OCD V.4
10 Ibanez WH-10 V.2
09 Splawn SuperStock
10 Jet City JCA-20
97 Fender Hot Rod Deluxe

Yeh the SICK! bit sounds a bit stupid.

#13
Thanks for the replies everyone. Seems like people are also 50/50 on this one.

My budget's $500 tops. If I got a classic 30 it would have to be used.

One more question: I'm going to be playing in an apartment at low volumes and probably will never be cranked up. Does it still make sense to get an tube? The cube's power squeezer helps in that respect (though i don't know how well it actually works).
#14
The Attenuators on the Cube and Vox don't do what they're designed to do in a tube amp and I honestly don't know what the point behind putting those on them does. Making it lower wattage will just make it sound worse when you turn it up louder.

The Classic 30 sounds good a low volumes, modern tube amps don't need to be turned up loud to get them to sound good.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#15
Quote by scott58
I gotta disagree here also. A small tube amp and 1 or 2 pedals is alot less complicated then an SS amp with all it's bells and whistles. i was overwhelmed by my transtube when i first started playing. i finally ended up setting all the dials at 12 o'clock and didn't move anything but the volume control for about a year.


+1 My first amp was a SS and it took me at least six months to figure out how all the effects and everything actually worked.

I would get a nice tube amp. May as well just get yourself a nice amp that sounds good and will keep you playing and getting better. They're not that much hassle.. I have fun experimenting with tubes and all that. You just can't match the sound of tubes.
#16
Quote by FrugalGuitarist
I think there are good solid state, digital, and tube amps in a variety of budgets. I would say set your budget first then see what you can afford. At a really low budget, like $200 USD and under you're mst likely find better tube amps than anything else. For slightly more there are some great solid state amps from Tech 21 and Fender as well as good tube amps from Crate and Peavey.


This post makes no sense, had to say it.

If you want versatility and effects to experiment with I would get something like the vox or the cube. If you want something with better tone and is fairly simple then get a classic 30.

The only "hassle" is replacing tubes, which honestly is no harder than swapping a light bulb. Power tubes last around 2 years, while preamp tubes usually go about 3-5 years. This all depends on how often you use the amp and how much you're cranking it.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#17
I personaly would go for the Roland Cube 30X or the Vox AD30VT. There is a lot to like about those amps and very little to dislike. They both have built in effects and offer good value for money. Both those amps would last you a could couple of years at least. During that time you would discover what music you like to play, what kind of tone you are looking for and what effects you like to use.