#1
OK, for some time now, Ive attempted to teach myself music theory. First of all, I bought these Hal Leonard Guitar Method books, which proved to be extremely simple. (I dont need to learn guitar, I need to learn theory) Next I printed the Music Theory: The Beginning lesson off of UG, which was really easy to understand, but I was lost at the part where I was supposed to apply it.
Ive gone through this process, several times. Doing this, getting bored, stopping, and forgetting it all. Ive only been playing for a year and a half, but I really love guitar. Ive found it less and less entertaining playing the same songs over and over, and I want to make my own music.
To prevent this from turning into a wall of text that nobody will read, Im gonna stop now... Does anybody have any tips on where to start, and how to apply it? I know, searchbar, trust me, Ive tried...
#3
I can intellectualize theory, but I cant find it on the fretboard. I know the major scales, where they are, but I have no clue what to do with them, etc
#4
Should I learn to learn sheet music thoroughly? I can play whats on sheet music, but not nearly as well as tabs.
#5
I've been playing for 5 years and you know more theory than me.
I would also like to learn
#6
to use major/minor/augmented or whatever scales: every song has a key. the key is just the scale in which the song is played in. so if the key of the song in C, than the scale you use to play the song, is C.
you dont always HAVE to play in said scale, such as "accidental notes" which is just a single note thats off key. you can play entire songs off key and have them sound great, but i would just stick to playing in key for now, with an accidental note thrown in here and there.

i believe thats what you meant when u said u know the major scales but dont know how to use them. if not than just ignore me.

and yes, learning to read sheet music is a very important part of playing any instrument, i highly suggest learning to read it. its really not difficult at all.


EDIT: if you would like to learn how to write some of your own music, i would suggest finding a backing track via the internet, and jamming to it for a little while, and than later put a legitiment(sp?) song to it. and eventually you can buy a program that you can make backing tracks with, such as power tracks, and than making a song using that. its what im doing with my guitar teacher and its a lot of fun. i hope i helped!!!

im done typing now....
Quote by Mo Jiggity
What he said. You are a wise man for not buying into the hype.

ya hear that...he thinks im wise
Last edited by thespian948 at Jul 20, 2008,
#7
Wow, thanks man, that really helped. I should learn more of sheet music (I occasionally hit a wrong note, or have trouble remembering the notes that are on the staff, especially switching from playing my bass and vice versa)
#8
Ok, last question. Do you think that learning to read music fluently will greatly aid in me learning theory?
#9
Quote by thespian948
to use major/minor/augmented or whatever scales: every song has a key. the key is just the scale in which the song is played in. so if the key of the song in C, than the scale you use to play the song, is C. you can also play in the relative minor of said scale, which in this case is Am, but thats for later.

Everything else was okay, but don't save this part for later because it's wrong. It's a common misconception that needs some clearing up so don't worry.

The scale you're using is defined not just by the notes and intervals but by the tonal center as well. If you're playing in C, your tonal center is C, so you're going to play the C major scale. The notes are going to be heard in relation to that tonal center, so no matter what pattern you play the notes C D E F G A B in, you're still just playing C major. In order to switch to Am, you'd also have to switch the tonality of the underlying harmony to A minor.
#10
im currently writing a song, in which the key is C: the chording is:
C,F,Dm,G
C,G,Am,F,G
and the scale i play in the entire time is Am. and it sounds perfectly fine. since the relative minor of C, is Am, i believe you can play in either scale, without having to change the underlying harmony. if im wrong it really doesnt matter. its not something TS needs to worry about yet. sorry for the mistake =]

ALSKI: it will help alittle bit with learning theory, but more importantly it will make you a better musician. also, KNOW THE NAME OF THE NOTES. i have been playing for a year and a half and am just learning the names of the notes, and is difficult as hell.
Quote by Mo Jiggity
What he said. You are a wise man for not buying into the hype.

ya hear that...he thinks im wise
#11
Quote by thespian948
im currently writing a song, in which the key is C: the chording is:
C,F,Dm,G
C,G,Am,F,G
and the scale i play in the entire time is Am. and it sounds perfectly fine. since the relative minor of C, is Am, i believe you can play in either scale, without having to change the underlying harmony. if im wrong it really doesnt matter. its not something TS needs to worry about yet. sorry for the mistake =]

You are wrong, yes; you cannot play in either scale because the tonal center defines which scale you're playing. Those progressions resolve to C, so you're playing the C major scale as much as you argue you're playing A minor. I'm just clarifying here, and hopefully pointing the TS away from a common error.
#12
Learning to read music will help you in any avenue of music you choose to pursue. That said, my guitar teacher is an incredible player and a theory guru, but can't read music either.

As far as scales, I would suggest starting with something simple, start with a major pentatonic and let that branch into a diatonic major scale. Learn to improvise within that scale, or "Key" more accurately, all over the neck. It all builds on itself.
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#13
Quote by :-D
You are wrong, yes; you cannot play in either scale because the tonal center defines which scale you're playing. Those progressions resolve to C, so you're playing the C major scale as much as you argue you're playing A minor. I'm just clarifying here, and hopefully pointing the TS away from a common error.


alright, thanks =] i will be sure to remeber that.
Quote by Mo Jiggity
What he said. You are a wise man for not buying into the hype.

ya hear that...he thinks im wise
#15
Come into MT and we can chat (don't, however, use the chat thread; make a new one). I'll go through that lesson sentence by sentence with you. However, you must ask a question about something you don't understand.
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Come into MT and we can chat (don't, however, use the chat thread; make a new one). I'll go through that lesson sentence by sentence with you. However, you must ask a question about something you don't understand.

Don't see you much down in this neck of the UG woods.