#1
I use a macke onyx satellite with some sort of EV dynamic vocal mic. When i plug headphones into the interface, it sounds very nice. The microphone seems like it picks up every sound, much like a condenser mic. But when i listen to it play back recordings on my computer, it sounds dull, like all of the responsiveness was lost and it is just very dry sounding.

Is this a problem with the transfer of data between my interface and computer, or just the limits of a dynamic microphone?
#2
what bit depth are you recording at, and what is the input volume on your computer set to?
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#4
that could be part of it too, but you really shouldn't loose that much responsiveness when recording.
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#5
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
that could be part of it too, but you really shouldn't loose that much responsiveness when recording.


that is true, but the comp speakers might be poor quality so, hmm TS do both of what we requested lol
#6
Well i don't know about bit depth, latency value is 128 and bit rate is 96. The volume is turned up all the way, i dont really know what the problem is.

I just know i sound really good through the headphones and it sounds like when i play it through my speakers it brings out all the weaknesses in my singing, and its not as clear
#8
Adding reverb and compression and EQ won't help the sound of the recording if the problem is bad speakers. Maybe it sounds just fine, but he doesn't realize it because of the speakers? Then his recording will sound grand on his system, but ****e on everyone else's!

Bit rate of 96..... I assume you mean sample rate? Where are you reading this? Your interface will probably work at the following sample rates (and quite well possibly others, but these are some basic ones)
-44.1Khz
-48 Khz
-88.2 Khz
-96 Khz

Quite honestly, we have the technology to record at very high sample rates. I think only bats can tell the difference between 96khz and 44.1 Khz, though. :lol:

Bit depth should be, these days, at least 24 bit. This is a measurable improvement over 16 bits. Even though some software will record at 32-bit, there isn't an interface out there that will actually capture 32-bit audio though.

What are you using to play back on (speakers)?

My guess is your culprit might be there. How does it sound when you listen back through the same phones you recorded with?

It is also possible that you are expecting more from your system than it is capable of. You won't get 'Bob Rock" results from your setup. If you are playing back and expecting a larger than life million-dollar studio sound, the end result will invariably be disappointing.

You can add EQ, compression, reverb, etc. to make it sound bigger, but you really have to be careful. As I alluded above, you need decent monitors (speakers that are actually built for mixing, not just for pleasure listening) to do that properly. Otherwise, as I say, it will sound grand on your system, but because your system isn't the same as everyone else's system, it won't, what they call, "translate well" to the other systems. You'll play it back in your friends car and it will all of a sudden sound like @ss. The number one culprits? Too much EQ, and too much reverb.

CT


CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.