#1
k so i just started messin with music theory yesterday and today i decided to jack with it a bit and try to figure out chords myself and then check them in this chord book i bought. i tried make a C# with the tonic C#, subdominant F, and dominant G# and i was right. YAY! but i noticed in the book it had F labeled as E# which yeah i know its the same thing but my question is is this the standard practice to label all the notes in a # chord as # or is it just like whatever. cuz then i looked up Eb and it labeled the notes as Eb Bb and G. why not Ab instead of G just for consistency? lol is it just random?

edit: derr Ab = G# not G but still an answer to the first question would be appreciated.
#2
Please read the first 4 "chapters" of the theory link in my sig. It should explain this and if you're still confused, I'll work with you afterwards. However, I need you to understand intervals, scale construction, and the major scale.
#3
i tried make a C# with the tonic C#, subdominant F, and dominant G# and i was right.
The subdominant of C# is actually F#

i noticed in the book it had F labeled as E# which yeah i know its the same thing but my question is is this the standard practice to label all the notes in a # chord as # or is it just like whatever.
In a diatonic scale such as C# major there are seven notes and each of the seven letters must be used only once. So C# major is C# D# E# F# G# A# B# instead of C# D# F F# G# A# C. You are correct that E# and F have the same pitch, but this makes reading and writing music easier
My name is Andy
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Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
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