#1
Hey guys I was wondering if up picking speed effects the speed of your alternate picking? I almost never up pick and I'm wondering if I learn to up pick better will it increase my alt picking speed?
#2
It could but for me, alternate picking is just a motion. It's not up and down picking it's just Alternate (Actually, I economy pick...but thats besides the point). You could try it though, I don't think it will help much because like I said Alternate picking isn't just straight up and down, it's a different thing completely.

If you can tremolo pick you should be able to pick pretty fast.
Last edited by Ze_Metal at Jul 21, 2008,
#3
I have read debate about this, and thought about the issue much myself.

Some people say you should practise both seperately, some say you should NOT practise up picking seperately, only down, or whatever...

I haven't really heard much conclusion on the topic, but it's quite an important one.
#4
Also, another question. This one is theory related but whatever.

Lets say you have a song in A major, would it be musically sound to do leads and / or a solo in a minor or do you have to use the relative minor? Or could you do both?
#5
For the first 1 1/2 years that I played, I could only pick upwards, as my down picking lacked accuracy (I began playing without a pick, which led to upstrokes), to this day I stil favour upstrokes, which doesn't bother me (worked for Marty Friedman). I found that alternate picking was too difficult unless I specifically practiced my downstrokes. Once my downstrokes had approached the same level of accuracy as the upstrokes, alternate picking was far easier.

Aboce all though, no matter how you practice, use a metronome.
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#6
Well you could do solos in the minor scale (we are talking like A minor over and A major backing right?) but it might sound quite bad. I'm sure if you pick the right notes at the right time you can make it work but it would be much safer, if you have to think minor, to use the relative minor but you should be aware that even if you think in the relative minor you're still actually just playing the major. The only thing that really changes is your perception/visualisation of the fretboard.

Edit: Slightly off topic but I saw a guy in a band the other week who used upstrokes for all the usually downpicked rhythm parts, he was up-picking at MoP speeds; it was phenominal to watch. Just a shame the band sucked.
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#7
Quote by Toniofalcon
Also, another question. This one is theory related but whatever.

Lets say you have a song in A major, would it be musically sound to do leads and / or a solo in a minor or do you have to use the relative minor? Or could you do both?


In blues you can deffo use both. It's all about using your ears and hearing what notes sound right and what doesn't. Obviously if it's a new song and you are playing live or complete improvisation you would stick more to what you know will at least sound acceptable.