#1
Hey guys , please bare with me. I've got a bit of story for you to read which may take some patience reading but I'm sure some of you can relate to it. I started playing the guitar when I was 14 and took to it brilliantly. It was one of the few things in life I excelled at, however I'm now 18 and am no better than what i was at 16, if anything I'm worse. My plea is for you too help me get back on track and rekindle the passion for guitar I once had.

During my first two years of playing the guitar i was blown away that by putting fingers on the fretboard in the same place as my idols i could reproduce sound similar to them. Therefore, I learnt hundreds of licks and songs which kept me content and motivated. However, learning songs only got me so far. I had a private teacher at school which i began learning theory with but then fell into the trap of begging him to teach me songs which I could have done myself.

It was here that i met my demise, i was learning new songs but getting no better. I started off with Green Day > Nirvana > AC/DC > Metallica > Guns and Roses > Iron Maiden > Racer X etc I got much better when i started learning Metallica in contrast to Green Day/Nirvana but since then im just learning songs and getting no better.

When I improvise I have a very poor knowledge of scales. I have some knowledge on the major/minor and the pentatonic/blues scales but these aren't enough any more.

I think it's obvious that i need to learn music theory, in order to understand how to improvise better, through learning scales/modes etc. To do so, surely I'd need to buy some books.

Would anyone recommend any books? I'm looking for books relevant to guitar theory not so much on how on how to read music..

I need something, whatever it is to get me back on track, learning other peoples songs is not making me better, so i need advise on how to take the next step

Books? Teacher ? Help!!?
#3
Nope have no knowledge on modes, considered it but then see something like Canon rock or surfing with the alien tabbed and fall straight in to the trap of learning how to play them rather than getting my head down.
#4
i'm sure if you knuckled down and thaught yourself about them from the internet you'd find yourself get better (( theres plenty on the internet)).
Mikey
#5
Quote by sharpy1
Nope have no knowledge on modes, considered it but then see something like Canon rock or surfing with the alien tabbed and fall straight in to the trap of learning how to play them rather than getting my head down.
http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/modes_ii.html


That's the only lesson on any theory that has really got me started. I understand way more than I did before because of that. Hope it helps you too.
#6
Quote by sharpy1
Nope have no knowledge on modes, considered it but then see something like Canon rock or surfing with the alien tabbed and fall straight in to the trap of learning how to play them rather than getting my head down.


You can combine them. For example, analyse some licks from Surfing with the Alien, write the notes down, and find out what mode/scale it is. Than practice that mode. This way you can play it, and you know a little bit more theory.
#7
Quote by fob12
http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/modes_ii.html


That's the only lesson on any theory that has really got me started. I understand way more than I did before because of that. Hope it helps you too.


*agrees*

Really try and knuckle down and get a moderate grasping of chords/scales, learn how and why they're constructed, DON'T just learn patterns.

After that you can begin to compromise, by all means learn a song but if you find a riff or lick that really stands out to you sit down with it and try to figure out everything they're doing/using, learn what chords they're using and try to understand why. Again if it's a lead line you like have a look at why those notes sound good with those chords, try to figure out what scale its from.

Personally i find applying Theroy to what you enjoy doing a much more profitable and efficent way to learn.

Do you have a way to record riffs and then play them back so you can improvise over them, if not i suggest you do as thats a great way to practise improvising with out finding someone to jam with (which i know can be nerve racking if your not used to it).
Wholenote Has a great little groove builder on it, ok it's nothing ground breaking but it has a large selection of chords and some standard grooves, great if you;ve got no way of recording.
Again just jam away and if you happen to play a lick you like memorise it and try to figure out why it sounds good.

Also have you had a look at rythm playing/reading i find so many lead guitarists (especially shreaders) who seem to forget about practising rythms once they learn how to solo (i know it happened to me) but i've found it a really great way to get out of a ruts while still focusing on important parts of your playing.

All in all just remember to have fun, if your not having fun you wont be learning. If you start to get bogged down with theroy and none of it is sticking, take a little break, let your brain digest the information then revisit it a day or so later, you'l be surprised at what you've actually remembered.
Last edited by IdeLOLogies at Jul 21, 2008,