#1
I have been playing for like 6 or 7 years and am starting to get a lot more serious about it, and consequently better. I have always stuck to learning theory like chord progressions and scales mostly. Also I spend alot more time playing with other guitarists and other instruments than most people I know. My main flaw is I really don't learn songs, occasionally I wonder how a riff is played and learn it, but rarely the entire song. Is this really so terrible? Most people I talk to tell me this is no way to learn, but I have gotten loads better at improvising, and very comfortable playing. As I said I'm starting to get more serious, and I'm now wondering if buckling down and learning songs would be beneficial or just continuing what I know and enjoy would still allow me to progress. Any thoughts?
#2
i think learning songs in their entirety is good moreso for the skill of songwriting and arrangement, which if you plan on writing songs that don't suck it's pretty crucial.
#3
Nooo, it's not really so bad, it does show you how to harmonize with another guitarist, but its not gonna inhibit your playing.
#4
It's not so bad, but being able to play all the way through a song is essential if you ever want to play live.
#5
Quote by tubetime86
I'm starting to get more serious, and I'm now wondering if buckling down and learning songs would be beneficial


yes, it almost certainly would be a benefit. Its good ear training, it will give you a musical perspective to all the theory you have learned, and its also inspiring (assuming music inspires you).
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 21, 2008,
#6
I find it very rewarding when I learn a new song all the way through. It's helps you to see the progress you make from all your hard work.
#7
It's not necessary but when someone asks you to play something and they're not musically inclined, making stuff up on the fly will not impress them as much as playing a song they are familiar with. Basically, it's not required but, everyone should have a few songs up their sleeves for times when you play for family/friends.
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Portugal. The Man »–
#8
All valid responses, sort of what I expected to hear. I would like to learn songs more, but I never learn them the whole way through mostly because I can't play two guitar parts and just one doesn't cut it. How do you overcome difficulty learning a song the whole way through without the accompaniment?
#9
Quote by tubetime86
All valid responses, sort of what I expected to hear. I would like to learn songs more, but I never learn them the whole way through mostly because I can't play two guitar parts and just one doesn't cut it. How do you overcome difficulty learning a song the whole way through without the accompaniment?


I basically make it a point to learn songs that sound good with 1 guitar. Thats hard to do if you only like modern music, as every band seems to have 2 guitars. Sometimes you have to explore a bit to find something thats worthwhile.
shred is gaudy music
#10
Quote by tubetime86
All valid responses, sort of what I expected to hear. I would like to learn songs more, but I never learn them the whole way through mostly because I can't play two guitar parts and just one doesn't cut it. How do you overcome difficulty learning a song the whole way through without the accompaniment?



http://ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=914878

I have solutions to that problem in that thread. Check it out.
#12
For me when i try and learn a song with two guitar parts I learn both parts, but use the melody parts when playing it back. For ex. if a second guitar is chunking out a chord prog. i'll play the other guitar part. Granted with a lot of music today there tend to be a lot of overdubs, but try and pick out the part that is/follows the main melody of the song. My 2cts.
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