#1
My friends tell me i'm like emotionless at the blues.

1. WTF does that mean?

2. can someone give me some helpfull tips?

3. thanks if u got answers^^
#3
I always kind of chuckle when I see blues players and their 'emotive blues faces' and posturing: almost like they have a certain part of their anatomy screwed up tightly in a vice. Or if they're getting an electric shock from the strings each time they pick a note. And it all looks very fake.

The emotion comes from the sound of your guitar playing, I reckon, not how much you can strain your facial features.
#5
Quote by slidething31
... I was joking.


Yeah, I knew that. Sorry if it looked like I thought you were serious.
#6
A ''feel'' comes inside a person. You must believe in what your playing, it must mean the world to you cause boy when you are playing you ain't playing the music, you are the music.
#7
Quote by DCH-guitar noob
My friends tell me i'm like emotionless at the blues


try to be honest with yourself about your playing. remember that you aren't just playing notes, you're trying to make a statement, it's your voice. be open and forthcoming about your own playing, to yourself, and then transfer that attitude TO your playing... the rest will follow.
#8
Quote by DCH-guitar noob
My friends tell me i'm like emotionless at the blues.

1. WTF does that mean?

2. can someone give me some helpfull tips?

3. thanks if u got answers^^


Wow, i thought that the stereotype that Americans can't spell and have poor grammar wasn't true. I was wrong....

Blues is all about emotion. You could be the most technically brilliant player, but without emotion, you wouldn't be a good blues player. If you need some help bringing your emotions out, i would suggest writing lyrics or poetry about your emotions. It stops you from locking your emotions away, so when you play the blues, your emotions are there to inspire you. Another tip would be to study the music of the blues greats. Clapton, Guy, the Kings, Stevie Ray et al were all very emotional players. When you listen to their music, you can feel what they're feeling
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#9
Some of us have good grammar.

Your playing can lack emotion in the same way as your conversations. If you're a boring conversationalist then you have to work to improve your speaking skills and become more interesting. The same applies for guitar. My advice is that you work on telling a story with your playing as opposed to playing notes in the scale. Try to make your playing fluid from start to finish within the progression, with a distinct beginning, middle and end. It is also helpful to think about certain things while playing. If you want a solo to sound sad, think of something sad and try to express it. If you want a solo to sound angry, happy, whimsical or any other emotion think of those.
#10
Do you have any way to put up a recording of you playing some blues? That would help a lot.
#11
Quote by theneildeal
Wow, i thought that the stereotype that Americans can't spell and have poor grammar wasn't true. I was wrong....


One bad apple does not prove a stereotype to be true.
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#12
A huge reason I think that some call others "soulless" or "emotionless" is because of a lack of dynamics.

-Try playing some notes harder, then soft; play a note in eighths going from soft to hard, and vice versa.

-Experiment with different ways of playing notes, don't strictly pick every one, slide into them, pull off or hammer into them, try playing the pentatonic scale where you hammer on or pull off the notes on every other string, bend into them.

-Bending. Bend different intervals instead of just a whole step. Try a half step (ie 4 to b5), or a minor third (ie 1 to b3). If you want to learn how to bend, this is the man: http://youtube.com/watch?v=QKJ-lBOFYrQ . Learn a solo of his or two, and don't just learn all the notes, copy all his nuances, like bend pitches, and VIBRATO.

-How could I forget vibrato, perhaps the most key part to adding "emotion" to your playing. So many different vibratos, so little time. Try to learn as many as you can. The first ones to pop into my mind are: the quick, almost nervous, shrill vibrato of B.B. King, the fat, punchy vibrato of SRV, and the freakishly smooth "circular" vibrato of Steve Vai.

I hope this helps, and remember, these aren't the kind of exercises that you can master overnight. Yes, it is good to put some time away to the basic feel down, but just keep them in mind whenever you're playing, and just watch as over time you develop your own feel for the guitar.
haha