#1
My band has this problem. I think we should play songs that aren't over played but are popular so people can relate to the song, sing along, etc. Also, because most of the time popular songs are popular because they're good. My friends think we should do the opposite and do less known songs because of some retarded reasons. Am i right or are they? Please help.
#3
Play less popular covers. For example, instead of playing Sweet Child o Mine, play Welcome to the Jungle. Or instead of Crazy Train try Mr Crowley. I could keep going on and on, but I think two examples is enough.
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#6
Play forgotten or neglected hits if you want a good compromise. Songs that people have kind of forgotten, but can really enjoy once they are reminded.


+1

If people have heard a song a hundred times, they'll be more critical about how well you play it, particularly if you've rearranged it or played it in a different style. If they've only heard it 10 times, though, they'll think 'wait..that's that song, isn't it? Forgot about it...sounds good!'

Example - If you play Wish You Were Here, everyone will know it, and will expect the solo to be just as good as Gilmour, and everything to be as they expect it.

If you play Mother, or similar...it's more interesting.
#7
Quote by Samzawadi
Example - If you play Wish You Were Here, everyone will know it, and will expect the solo to be just as good as Gilmour, and everything to be as they expect it.

If you play Mother, or similar...it's more interesting.


And if you play a Saucerful of Secrets they'll think you're a bunch of loons.
#8
I agree, don't go with the over-played stuff that every band in the universe does at least twice a night kind of thing.

However, do NOT pick an obscure track that people don't know. If they don't know it, they're not really interested in having you introduce them to it.

To use the Nirvana example. Come As You Are would be a better choice than Teen Spirit - agreed. Last cover band I was in, we did In Bloom. Still.... everyone knows those. Don't dig too deep and do something like Grey Goose.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Quote by axemanchris
I agree, don't go with the over-played stuff that every band in the universe does at least twice a night kind of thing.

However, do NOT pick an obscure track that people don't know. If they don't know it, they're not really interested in having you introduce them to it.

To use the Nirvana example. Come As You Are would be a better choice than Teen Spirit - agreed. Last cover band I was in, we did In Bloom. Still.... everyone knows those. Don't dig too deep and do something like Grey Goose.

CT


I like the nirvana example. TS, start by looking at the hits your bandmates want to play, then pick less played (but still recognizable) songs from the same artists. Move on from there.
#10
Quote by shawnpl
My band has this problem. I think we should play songs that aren't over played but are popular so people can relate to the song, sing along, etc. Also, because most of the time popular songs are popular because they're good. My friends think we should do the opposite and do less known songs because of some retarded reasons. Am i right or are they? Please help.


Strike a balance. If you wanna cover, lets say a metallica (just an example) song. Don't do the blindingly obvious (Enter Sandman, Master of Puppets, One) do a lesser known one such as Leper Messiah, Blackened or Ride the Lightning. Don't do unknown stuff like Phantom Lord or Escape. Something semi recognisable.
#11
If I were in that position, I would just do the songs I wanted to do, regardless of how popular they were. But seeing as you guys are not me, I would try to do two tihings.
1. Like a lot of people have said, play less popular but still recognizable tunes.
2. Take an obscure song, and find a way to rearrange it to fit your style.
#12
Quote by ohhey9040
If I were in that position, I would just do the songs I wanted to do, regardless of how popular they were.

I agree, your best initial indicator of what a cover band should be doing is yourself, what you would like an ideal cover band to do.
After that it's a case of trial and error, constantly replace songs that don't go down to well live with other songs until you eventualy arrive at a general set that goes down well.
Of course, remember that not all audiences have the same tastes in music. Eventualy, after gaining experience, and after building up a large back catalogue of covers, you learn to read an audience and can adjust your set to suit accordingly.
#13
Just play some Bodom...That solves everyones problem. Who doesn't wanna hear a little "Everytime I Die"?
#14
Doing lesser known songs allow you to be able to do more with them in the way of making them your own. Bruce Springsteen covered Jimmy Cliff's Trapped, which was a funky reggae number until Bruce got a hold of it. He turned it into an anthmatic rock song that was a staple in his live show during the 80s.
#15
Alternative rocker as I am, I would prefer to play any unknown song anyday, but I guess if you want the short ride to success you could go ahead and play some famous songs and gain fans that way. Lazy and unpersonal way IMO, but of course that's up to anyone to decide for themselves.
#16
Quote by Strati
Alternative rocker as I am, I would prefer to play any unknown song anyday, but I guess if you want the short ride to success you could go ahead and play some famous songs and gain fans that way. Lazy and unpersonal way IMO, but of course that's up to anyone to decide for themselves.

Yeah, it's basicaly a toss up between personal taste and making the money.
A pro musician, who plays gigs to make a living, will play whatever it takes to make his band popular, which brings in more gigs with better wages.
A hobbyist, or a more creative musician, someone who's in it purely for their own personal satisfaction, will play whatever he damn well wants to play because the amount of money he makes isn't really an issue.
Of course, it's not impossible for the more creative musician to become successful enough to earn a living, but it's not as likely, and when you have maybe a family depending on you bringing home the bread, you choose songs that will please the audience.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jul 24, 2008,
#17
Right there.... audience. Are you playing for YOU or are you playing for the audience?

The problem I have with the indie rock aesthetic is that the notion of 'I'll play what I want to play, whether others like it or not' is just selfish. Your audience came out to see you. They could be at home watching CSI, or they could be down the street seeing some other band, or hanging with friends or whatever. They chose to come and see YOU. Don't be so damned selfish to think that their opinion/enjoyment doesn't matter.

Play for YOU, fine. But don't impose sh!t on the audience they're not really interested in hearing. And that includes obscure covers that nobody knows.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#18
do both
that way everyones happy
My name is Vikki. Use it

We took the last train
Out of the city
To plan our great escape
#19
Play less known songs by well known bands. You will have instant win.
Question not yourself. Challenge those who would deny you your true self for an independent thinker is the greatest enemy to those who seek to control you
#20
Quote by Helloween_rox
Play less known songs by well known bands. You will have instant win.


Even better.... well-known songs by less known bands!

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.