#2
For lyrics... getting drunk.

for guitar parts, effing around.

So far... its worked out alright for me.
#3
what if your not legally allowed to get drunk???
Quote by Pleasure2kill
Why do Verizon workers show up to work drunk all the time?
Cus they have more bars in more places lolololol
#5
If you can't drink, stay up all night past the point of tired and to the point where you can still wing it. You go loopy like that.
#6
There are tons of different approaches to songwriting. One thing that will undoubtedly help your songwriting is learning music theory. Learn how to build scales from their formulas, learn how to harmonize the scales to get the diatonic chords, learn about how to write progressions and chord functions (the effect each chord has in a progression) and learn how to go about writing melodies over the chords. Start with the major scale because it's the easiest to work with and almost everything else in western music is either based on the major scale or looked at in relation to it. This is a good lesson that should help you to gain that knowledge.
#7
I was taught a really simple way to get my brain from always coming up with the same stuff regarding chord progressions. Here goes:

Get a single dice (die?) from a board game.

Pick a key you like, any key.

Roll the die.

Use the rolled number as the chord identifier in the diatonic progression. I know there are only 6 sides to the die and there are 7 chords in the key. So shoot me. Unless you're playing jazz you'll probably rarely use the vii chord, anyway. If you want to use it, just arbitrarily replace a number you rolled with the vii chord.

You'll be surprised what you'll come up with and you've taken your brain out of the process.
Jam On!
#8
Quote by Eirien
There are tons of different approaches to songwriting. One thing that will undoubtedly help your songwriting is learning music theory. Learn how to build scales from their formulas, learn how to harmonize the scales to get the diatonic chords, learn about how to write progressions and chord functions (the effect each chord has in a progression) and learn how to go about writing melodies over the chords. Start with the major scale because it's the easiest to work with and almost everything else in western music is either based on the major scale or looked at in relation to it. This is a good lesson that should help you to gain that knowledge.

Right on.

Lyrics - You don't have to get drunk or stay up late. Just write a lot. About what? Everything and anything. Look for different word games and exercises. Like anything you will improve with Practice Practice Practice.

As for the thing with the dice. That's taking all the intelligence out of songwriting and making it a random process. It might have it's uses purely as an exercise in learning how chords affect each other but as a valid songwriting technique any idiot can roll a dice.
Si