#1
i'm sure this phenomenon is familiar to many people here. when i'm playing single notes, especially on the G B E strings, around the 8th fret, other strings will resonate. which creates a dissonant tone.
i've been told i have to develop a technique to mute these other strings, which is proving to be a colossal task.
i am entirely baffled to see other players who don't do a damn thing to mute unwanted resonance, and they don't get any resonance?
is this something that is peculiar to guitars with tremolos? or specifically floyd-floaters?
#2
try putting a hair band or something of that sort at the nut. it should eliminate some of that
....................................................................................................................................................................................
#3
No, it's a very common thing. It's also relativley easy to sort out. Just rest your palm on the strings you don't want to sound while playing the notes you do want to sound. Mute the lower strings with your right hand paml, just like paml muting, and use your left hand palm to mute strings above the notes you are playing. With a bit of practise you should be able to master this relatively quickly.
Quote by uvq
yeah fire him secretly... thats what im doing except im firing myself and secretly joining someone elses band

Quote by Jekkyl
If you get a virus by looking at porn, is it considered a sexually-transmitted disease?

Quote by DiveRightIn63
thanks for the compliment man!
#4
efficaciously putting on a string dampener of some kind would definitely take care of that. as far as a technique to mute the strings, i've been playing for years and i didn't realize until now that my left and right hands both do various things to mute the strings i'm not playing. like, if i'm on the G B or E strings, like in a solo, i'm like...righteouly palm muting the other strings with my wrist instead of my hand. i can't tell if that made any sense, but i tried.
Megadeth > Metallica
Gibson > Fender
Randy Rhoads > Everybody

Quote by gamenerd323
451f you sig is the truest thing in the world

My sig > Yours
#5
Quote by hXc metal dude
try putting a hair band or something of that sort at the nut. it should eliminate some of that

Thats cheating! Nah im just kidding i don't care what you do. MAB has this special device for his stupid double axe that does this same thing so he can play legato on 2 necks with 1 hand each.

If your playing on the bottom 3 just palm mute the top 3. You can find a way to mute them just keep messing around. I don;t even think about muting anymore it just happens on its own. I play on a floyd rose trem and sometimes and I notice no added muting problems so i dont think its that.
#7
yea i had the same problem about a month ago and i asked some people on this forum. they told me basically what these people have told you.

what i can say is this: muting involves interaction between the left and right hands. when playing you mute low strings with your right hand palm. with the left hand you mute the string below with the tip of the index finger and then you should naturally lay the rest of the finger across the strings to mute any higher strings and keep them from ringing out. just play through some scale runs slowly making sure that any unwanted noise is muted. as i said, took me about two to three weeks to have it come naturally.
#8
Damn, I've noticed this problem lately when I do simple alternate picking runs. Gotta fix it.
Originally Posted by SkyValley
yeah im a virgin but im also pretty good at things like ping-pong and drawing pictures of people playing water polo so it balances out
#9
What i dont understand is, does this technique becoming natural affects playing notes and wanting the let them all ring out?
#10
Quote by alexcp94
What i dont understand is, does this technique becoming natural affects playing notes and wanting the let them all ring out?


This sentence barely makes any sense...

What I think you're getting at is something like "Does learning to mute strings stop you from letting strings ring when you want them to?" and the answer should be no.

Whenever you learn to do something on guitar you should always be learning control of your instrument more than anything else and, to me, control is being able to do what you want with it. So you shouldn't be learning one aspect of technique at the expense of other areas; new things you learn should be relatively easy to incorporate into your playing style with little to no physical adjustment.

If learning to mute means that somehow you loose the ability to let strings ring you need to go back and start learning it again so you can learn in in a way that means you have control over it.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#12
I have never had this problem. :/
My gear:
  • Fender American Standard Telecaster
  • Ibanez RG450
  • Laney VC15
  • Electro Harmonix HOG
  • Vox Satchurator
  • Blackout Effectors Musket fuzz
  • Electro Harmonix Pulsar
  • Earthquaker Devices Disaster Transport
  • Malekko Chicklett

#13
Quote by Gord@k
I have never had this problem. :/


Well...that's nice and all but...y'know...why post?
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.