#1
Today, I was jamming with my friend, and I showed him this riff I wrote, and then he said, "that's the same as my riff". He played me his riff, and it turns out to be the same thing, except I added another chord to the rhythm, and varied a part with an arpeggio. I never knew he wrote that riff, but he wrote it back in May, when I wrote mine about a month ago. I never heard it before, and we both agreed it to be coincidental. He says though, because he wrote his riff first, I should have to change mine. I don't think this right. What should I Do?
#2
fight to the death over something so petty
Sweeping is for n00bs. I've moved on to vacuuming. Eventually I'll even try steam cleaning.


Bitches don't know
#6
Are you in a band?

If so, it doesn't matter who wrote it.
*-)
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#7
Quote by messiah01
Today, I was jamming with my friend, and I showed him this riff I wrote, and then he said, "that's the same as my riff". He played me his riff, and it turns out to be the same thing, except I added another chord to the rhythm, and varied a part with an arpeggio. I never knew he wrote that riff, but he wrote it back in May, when I wrote mine about a month ago. I never heard it before, and we both agreed it to be coincidental. He says though, because he wrote his riff first, I should have to change mine. I don't think this right. What should I Do?


Rework it and use it again in another song or something. Happens all the time. Metallica reworked "The Mechanix" into "The Four Horsemen" after Mustaine left. Both songs stand alone fine.
#8
Are either of you actually planing to use this riff (like write a song out of it with a band) or are you just writing random riffs?

If one of you is and one of you isn't then just let the one who is use the riff, because the other one doesn't need it anyway.

If both of you are (in different bands) then you should both use the riff, perhaps slight variations of it, because, unless it is going to be the main riff, both songs should come out pretty different anyway.

If neither of you are going to actually use it then grow the fvck up.


Also, the chance of this being coincidental is quite small, so maybe one of you did copy it from the other, or perhaps you both heard somewhere else then forgot about it.

I do also agree with 666nate666, though, and possibly you could film it and a link here.

*Waits in anticipation*
#9
You can write practicaly any riff and I guarrantee that it will have been used somewhere else at some time. After all, there are only twelve notes so accidental riff repetition is bound to happen, this is why in musical copyright, melody and lyrics in relation to the riffs are more important than the copyright of riffs themselves.
Check out this thread;
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=911827&page=1&pp=20
axemanchris explains it really well.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jul 23, 2008,
#11
Quote by SlackerBabbath
You can write practicaly any riff and I guarrantee that it will have been used somewhere else at some time. After all, there are only twelve notes so accidental riff repetition is bound to happen, this is why in musical copyright, melody and lyrics in relation to the riffs are more important than the copyright of riffs themselves.
Check out this thread;
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=911827&page=1&pp=20
axemanchris explains it really well.


+1
#13
Quote by JagStang5246
So if my band has a song that has a riff very similar to an In Flames riff, It's ok?



As long as its only similar, not the exact same thing. Taking a riff and making it into your own song from it isnt something I would do.
#14
Quote by JagStang5246
So if my band has a song that has a riff very similar to an In Flames riff, It's ok?

Let's have a look at an example, two very famous songs, 'Wild Thing' and 'Louie Louie.'
Wild Thing goes A,A, D,D, E,E, D,D (repeat)
Louie Louie goes A,A,A, D,D, E,E,E, D,D. (repeat)
The only difference between them is the extra note in A and E, apart from that, the main riffs of these songs are exactly the same.
Take almost any rock 'n' roll classic, say 'Johnny B. Goode' by Chuck Berry. It basicaly goes A, D, A, E, A, which is known as the 'three chord trick', as used extensively by almost every other rock 'n' roll band from the 50s, The Beach Boys, Status Quo, and a whole lot of other bands and this riff, or a form of it, can be found in literaly thousands and thousands of songs.
So if this basic riff can be the backbone of so many songs, then how is this possible without lawsuits flying left, right and centre? The answer is the melody line.
As long as the melody line is different enough then you are safe.

When the Beach Boys released 'Surfin' USA' the song so closely resembled Chuck Berry's 'Sweet Little Sixteen' that the threat of a lawsuit gave Berry co-writing credit on their album of the same name. It wasn't because of the riff, which has been repeated countless times in different songs both before and after Berry wrote 'Sweet Little Sixteen' (y'see, Chuck Berry wasn't even the originator of the riff as it was simply a standard blues riff of the time speeded up) but it was because the melody had exactly the same tune, same stops, same gaps, everything apart from the actual words was the same.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jul 24, 2008,