#1
So, my friends and I are up to play You Shook Me All Night Long on a festival. I'm going to "improvise" a solo there, but I need to know in wich scale do I need to do it.I'm good at playing, but no so good at theory. Does anybody knows in wich scale should I do it?!?!?!

Help UG!
#2
why you don't play the real solo improvising is hard because it has to fit in the rythem section now what i mean???
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#4
The song seems to be in the key of G, so any G major scale would work perfectly fine.
#5
because another friend of mine who isn´t as good as me felt really bad, so i let him play the solo as Young plays it
#7
ah is see !!!! is he in the same band
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Dean Cemetery Gates Razorback
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EH LPB-1
Peavey 6505
D'addario strings, DR strings
Dunlop picks
#9
Quote by fob12
The song seems to be in the key of G, so any G major scale would work perfectly fine.
Minor scales are more common in blues and rock than major scales. G minor would be appropriate here.
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Minor scales are more common in blues and rock than major scales. G minor would be appropriate here.

Doesn't Angus Young usually play the major and minor Pentatonic?
#12
BGC, at your convenience, could you PM me, or post here explaining why it is ok to solo in a major key with something like the blues or minor pentatonic scale? Thanks
#14
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Because it sounds good.


mmk, just thought there might be a theoretical reason.
#15
Quote by rockadoodle
mmk, just thought there might be a theoretical reason.
It's related to altered dominant chords.

I can explain in more detail if you really want, but it's a lot of of words that lead back to "it sounds good."
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote
It's related to altered dominant chords.

I can explain in more detail if you really want, but it's a lot of of words that lead back to "it sounds good."

Is this stuff you learn over the course of messing around different scales with different chords?
#18
I'll do it. AC/DC plays straight rock, which is based on the blues. Blues is usually based on dominant chords (including the tonic of the song), which contain the intervals major third, perfect fifth, and minor seventh based off the chords' root note, or the formula 1-3-5-b7. The minor pentatonic scale contains the intervals minor third, perfect fourth, perfect fifth, and minor seventh based on its root, or the formula 1-b3-4-5-b7. If you play that scale over a dominant chord with both scale and chord based on the same root note, when you play the b3 it will want to move upward a semitone to the 3. Notice how often blues and rock guitarists give a slight bend to the b3 then play the 1 when they solo; the rub between the minor third and the major third is the basis of the blues sound, and when you hear the slight bend you're hearing the 'blue 3rd'.

A very common tool of blues and blues-based guitarists is to solo using the minor pentatonic and major pentatonic scales based off the same root. So, for the AC/DC song, you would play both G minor pentatonic and G major pentatonic. You could also throw in the passing b5 note at your discretion; in this case, Db. Have fun experimenting.
known as Jeff when it really matters
#19
Quote by titopuente
I'll do it. AC/DC plays straight rock, which is based on the blues. Blues is usually based on dominant chords (including the tonic of the song), which contain the intervals major third, perfect fifth, and minor seventh based off the chords' root note, or the formula 1-3-5-b7. The minor pentatonic scale contains the intervals minor third, perfect fourth, perfect fifth, and minor seventh based on its root, or the formula 1-b3-4-5-b7. If you play that scale over a dominant chord with both scale and chord based on the same root note, when you play the b3 it will want to move upward a semitone to the 3. Notice how often blues and rock guitarists give a slight bend to the b3 then play the 1 when they solo; the rub between the minor third and the major third is the basis of the blues sound, and when you hear the slight bend you're hearing the 'blue 3rd'.

A very common tool of blues and blues-based guitarists is to solo using the minor pentatonic and major pentatonic scales based off the same root. So, for the AC/DC song, you would play both G minor pentatonic and G major pentatonic. You could also throw in the passing b5 note at your discretion; in this case, Db. Have fun experimenting.
That makes a lot of sense now. I wondered why people would be to notes that aren't in that particular scale they stuck to for most of the song. Thanks.
#20
Okay, so dominat chords contain a 3 and a b7. The interval between these notes is a tritone, which is a very dissonant interval. Altered dominant theory is very complex, but the basic idea is that, as long as it's dissonant, why not make it really dissonant? That way, when you resolve the chord (ex. Galt to C) the resolution is even sweeter.

In the blues, the #5 isn't typically played, but the #9 (b3) and #4 (b5) are very common.
#21
Quote by bangoodcharlote
G minor pentatonic and blues


QFT

All this unnecessary bickering if you look at the tabs and listen to the solo he is not playing the differentiating G major notes. He plays a G minor pentatonic. I dont think theres any blues notes in there but I could be wronfg.
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Last edited by Leper_Messiah_ at Jul 22, 2008,
#22
Your making to much of a big deal of this^
To improv over ACDC pent scale with blues licks is all you need.
#23
Quote by titopuente
Notice how often blues and rock guitarists give a slight bend to the b3 then play the 1 when they solo; the rub between the minor third and the major third is the basis of the blues sound, and when you hear the slight bend you're hearing the 'blue 3rd'.


Yes. You can also go the distance and bend it all the way to the major third instead of just in between, that happens at least once in that solo I believe.

Quote by titopuente
A very common tool of blues and blues-based guitarists is to solo using the minor pentatonic and major pentatonic scales based off the same root. So, for the AC/DC song, you would play both G minor pentatonic and G major pentatonic. You could also throw in the passing b5 note at your discretion; in this case, Db. Have fun experimenting.


Yes. One other interesting thing about that solo is that the highest note Angus plays is a C note (he bends the B note a half step up to the C). The C note is not found in the G major penta scale, so for a brief second there its actually more of a G major scale sound.
#24
Quote by Leper_Messiah_
All this unnecessary bickering if you look at the tabs and listen to the solo he is not playing the differentiating G major notes. He plays a G minor pentatonic.


No. It's not just G minor penta, it is G major penta too.

Better re-check those tabs or give the solo another listen.

A big part of the blues and blues rock is shifting back and forth between minor and major penta (and as titopuente said, the area in between the b3 and the 3rd). Check out the first 12 bars of Red House by Hendrix for a good example of this.
#25
backtracking: OK, I went back and actually listened to the solo (this is always helpful, ha!). Most of what I remember as B notes are actually as titopuente said, the Bb note bent up to the "blue area" between the b3 and 3rd.

So saying that the solo is in G major penta as well as G minor penta is probably a stretch, sorry, I was wrong.

However that highest note (the high C, followed by B natural) definitely has a major sound.

BTW, I also was wrong about how those notes are played, both start with the Bb (first string, 18th fret), first he bends a whole step up to C, then he bends a half step up to B. (B natural, not Bb, which gives it that major sound).

But the two main points here remain:

1) blues is not just minor penta, it can also be major penta

2) bending the b3 up to a major third, or in between (the "blue" note), is very common
#27
BGC please tell me your a music major, because if your not my self-worth just dropped considerably.
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#28
Quote by tubetime86
BGC please tell me your a music major, because if your not my self-worth just dropped considerably.
Math and chemistry/pre-med. But I did take private lessons for several years.