#1
what techniques should i study or focus more when lookign into Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jeff Beck, Buddy Guy and alike artists?

thanks
Brasil.

Quote by Daneeka
I heard there is uranium gas in the tubes. So you could easily make a little nuclear blast. If i were you, i wouldn't want to start the World War III.




THE SHORT BACK AND SIDES !!!

Fender Jaguar HH
Digitech RP355
#3
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Alternate picking and legato


thanks
Brasil.

Quote by Daneeka
I heard there is uranium gas in the tubes. So you could easily make a little nuclear blast. If i were you, i wouldn't want to start the World War III.




THE SHORT BACK AND SIDES !!!

Fender Jaguar HH
Digitech RP355
#4
Bending & vibrato are two key elements to focus on. SRV used a real aggressive percussive style of playing, he would rake muted strings quite often which fattens up the sound of single note lines. that's an essential technique to get down to be able to emulate his sound. you can get the basics of it here from this guy http://youtube.com/watch?v=2VqXo3inORs Learn songs from the artists you mentioned, and as you're learning you'll encounter the various techniques they use often.
#5
The only real way to get into SRV's technique, imo, is to listen to lots of his playing, watch videos of him playing, and learn how to play his music. Really, that's the only way to get into anyone's technique, but SRV's is particularly difficult to explain, I've found.
#6
If you want to get SRV's sound (aside from trying to replicate his tone, good luck with that) there a few things you can look at.

1. The muting technique that Stash Jam described above; look for that kind of thing in the intros of "Pride and Joy" and "Texas Flood". Learn to apply the muting idea to a standard blues shuffle.

2. Vibrato. This is a huge key, and it goes along with his aggressive style of play. Watch some videos of him playing and you'll see that he gets a lot of power from his forearm and wrist; he shakes the whole guitar in addition to the string(s) he's playing. Work on building up your strength and dexterity to the point where you can use this kind of wide vibrato but still manage to control it.

3. Picking. Very simply, just learn to pick aggressively and accurately. SRV hit the strings HARD, and if you want to copy his style you're going to have to do the same. He has a couple of licks you can practice on and likes incorporating fast legato, so try working on patterns like this. This is from the beginning of "Texas Flood" and is one of my favorite licks to use when soloing.


e--------3-------6-3h5p3-------6b8----------
B-----3----6p3-------------6/8--------------
G-5b-------------------------------------------
D------------------------------------------------
A------------------------------------------------
E-----------------------------------------------


These are just basic pointers, but learn to apply them by practicing over blues tracks.
#7
Jeff Beck would be the hardest of the three you mentioned. So while you get your lessons above in SRV, I'll give you a tip about Jeff Beck. He uses his fingers, no pick. He uses his whammy bar, no slide. He has the most amazing vibrato. He has the most amazing ear and can solo on one note, using his bar to get every other note.

Alot of people try his techniques and fail, why? No idea. Perhaps they thought he was too easy. Jeff is legend, still breathing too.

Listen to his work on "Blaze of glory" with Jon Bon Jovi. That is his whammy bar, brilliant work.

Pull offs, bends, hammer ons, legato if you wish. Primarily, vibrato. And the most often used technique that all three use which you'll have to learn daily for 8 hours... that would be "feel".

Good luck, enjoy.

**Ps: Buddy Guy, same as above without the whammy.

** ** Pss: VIBRATO
#8
Quote by :-D
This is from the beginning of "Texas Flood" and is one of my favorite licks to use when soloing.


e--------3-------6-3h5p3-------6b8----------
B-----3----6p3-------------6/8--------------
G-5b-------------------------------------------
D------------------------------------------------
A------------------------------------------------
E-----------------------------------------------




??? I don't recognize that lick at all, and I know that song (at least the beginning) inside and out.

If you're talking about the first fast run in the song, following the G to C chord change, it's this:


e--------3---------5--3h4p3----3---6b---6b1/2---3----
B-----3----6b--3-------------6----------------------3-
G-5b-----------------------------------------------------5b--
D-----------------------------------------------------------
A-----------------------------------------------------------
E-----------------------------------------------------------


The first finger is barred of course across the first two strings for most of above, except when bending first string

The hammer-on to the fourth fret is a subtle thing, for the longest time I thought it was a hammer-on to the fifth fret, not fourth, until I read in a guitar mag a little more about that lick, and listened to it slowed down. SRV got it from T-Bone Walker. SRV uses it a lot, you can also hear that lick in the outro solo to Pride and Joy, and in several otherplaces on Texas Flood cd.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Alternate picking and legato


You could say that about most good guitarists. What makes SRV Beck & Guy different in that regard?
#10
Stash Jam and blueStrat: good advice.

Another unique aspect I think to SRV's playing was double-stops. Sure, all guitarists use them, but SRV particularly favored them, and used a wide variety of them. He also used triple-stops, the intro to Texas Flood for example, or the outro solo of P&J (where he actually bends the triple-stop, ouch!)

Double-stops are interesting because you might miss them if you limit your thinking to penta box shapes. One of the most common for example has a note that is "outside" the minor penta scale:

-------
-5--3-
-5--3-
-------
-------
-------

Assuming key of G for above, you can see that the E note on second string fifth fret isn't in your basic G minor penta scale.
#12
Quote by :-D
guitarviz: You're closer than I was, I was just doing that from memory. However, your "3h4p3" should be "3h5p3" as I notated. No big deal.


Nope, what SRV played was 3h4p3. I know, it sounds unusual. That's what I was talking about in my post about that lick being a real subtle thing, like you for a long time I just heard it as 3h5p3, and when I saw a transcription in a guitar mag I thought "worthless transcription". But the accompanying notes talked about how it had its origins as a T-Bone Walker lick. So I went and listened to that lick slowed-down, and sure enough, it's the fourth fret. I was so curious I went and listened for that same lick in other places, to see if he did the same thing or if it was just a mistake (going one fret above the root when maybe he meant to go two). You can hear that same lick in other places in the song, at these times:

0:49
1:18
3:45
4:04

And each time, it has that b2 instead of a 2.

It's one of his signature licks, you can also hear it in Mary Had A Little Lamb and Lenny (different keys, of course, but same position relative to the underlying penta scale)

You gotta slow it down to hear it. Here's what I use:
http://www.ronimusic.com/

I've been doing a lot of listening to SRV lately
http://www.guitarviz.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=33

p.s. don't buy anything yet, everything's still in beta but the software is a free download, comes with a short demo file played by yours truly, and is in reasonably stable condition
#14
^Always a negative somewhere.

Advertising is good. Especially in this case as it applies to alex's initial question.