#1
Hey

I'm just wondering does the chord progression formula:

M,m,m,M,M,m,dim,M

Apply only to the major scale? like if i wanted to base that formula around a minor key would it go something like....

m,dim,,M,m,m,M,M,m

or is there a different formula at all for minor?

cheers for any help or input.
#3
:P lol correct on which part? that it would become m,dim,,M,m,m,M,M,m for a minor? or that theres a different formula?
Last edited by Axe Samurai at Jul 23, 2008,
#4
No, its how you said the first time.

There isn't a different formula.
I bet you five bucks that I play guitar.
#5
Major and minor are basically the same but minor is offset starting from the 6th degree.

C D E F G A B Major = A B C D E F G Minor

C E G = C major
D F A = D minor
E G B = E minor
F A C = F major
G B D = G major
A C E = A minor
B D F = B dim

so for the minor key-

A B C D E F G

A C E = A minor
B D F = B dim
C E G = C major
D F A = D minor
E G B = E minor
F A C = F major
G B D = G major


As you can see, these are all the same chords.

Conventionally the chords in a key are written using roman numerals. In a major key-
I ii iii IV V vi viio

Upper case is major, lower case is minor, the o means dim (here)

So these same chords in a minor key would then be-
i iio III vi v VI VII

Do you see how they have moved positions but now gained new numerals with respect to the key?
#6
Yeah i knew minor started from the 6th degree that's why i came up with the m,dim,,M,m,m,M,M,m forumla myself but i just wasn't sure about the diminished in the 2nd position kinda made me feel uneasy...if you understand lol


but thanks alot anyway for clearing it up for me
#8
It might technically be the same formula, but most composers would use a dominant fifth chord in place of the minor chord. So in Am, they would use an E7 instead of an Em. Also, the last chord (G), is also sometimes replaced with a G#diminished (this has to do with the new dominant chord).
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#9
Quote by demonofthenight
It might technically be the same formula, but most composers would use a dominant fifth chord in place of the minor chord. So in Am, they would use an E7 instead of an Em. Also, the last chord (G), is also sometimes replaced with a G#diminished (this has to do with the new dominant chord).

Is this why?

G#-B-D-F -> A-C-E-G

G#>A half-step resolution
B>C half-step resolution
F>E half-step resolution
G#>G??? half-step resolution
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#10
Quote by metal4all
Is this why?

G#-B-D-F -> A-C-E-G

G#>A half-step resolution
B>C half-step resolution
F>E half-step resolution
G#>G??? half-step resolution
Thats one reason. Better resolution to the i chord (as opposed to the III chord, which wouldnt be minor). Except you wouldnt normally resolve on a 7th chord, especially not a minor seventh in minor (I've seen it done nicely though)

Also because the VII diminished chord is sometimes used as a substitute for the V dominant chord. Picture this: E7=E,G#,B,D | G#dim=G#, B, D, F

Nottice anything e(except my shodddy typing and spelling). What makes it better is that the diminished fifth of that chord spilts causes the root to become ambiguouse and confused, meaning it might as well be a rootless E7 (see good substitute). Its also dissonant, so it wants to resolve.
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[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
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