#2
They are enharmonic (They produce the same tone but have different names). Tonally, all the chords are the same, but that doesn't mean that they are the same.

Look at the key C# major. It has B# in it. You would NOT say C though, it's B#.
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#3
It's a matter of context. If you spell funny with a 'ph' it will sound the same but it's still wrong.
#5
Quote by metal4all
They are enharmonic (They produce the same tone but have different names). Tonally, all the chords are the same, but that doesn't mean that they are the same.

Look at the key C# major. It has B# in it. You would NOT say C though, it's B#.


I understand that the correct spelling of specific enharmonic notes is determined by the context in which they are used but what about when you're talking about the context as a whole?

The Key of C#major. Is it ever used? Isn't it easier to call the key Db major and use five flats instead of 7 sharps?

As far as the key of Gb Major and the key of F#Major is it simply personal preference as to which one you use since they have 6bs and 6#s respectively.
Si
#6
yeah the word is enharmonic, the sound the same, but are spelled differently. F# and Gb scales sound exactly the same, but Gb has 6 flats: Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Cb. and F# has 6 sharps: F# C# G# D# E# A#
#7
Quote by 20Tigers
The Key of C#major. Is it ever used? Isn't it easier to call the key Db major and use five flats instead of 7 sharps?
If you were to play in the key of C and then modulate up a half-step, it would be incorrect to write the key as Db. When you ascend chromatically, you call notes by their charp name. Likewise, when you descend chromatically, you call the notes by their flat name.

Ex.
Ascending: F F# G G# A A# B
Descending: B Bb A Ab G Gb F
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
If you were to play in the key of C and then modulate up a half-step, it would be incorrect to write the key as Db. When you ascend chromatically, you call notes by their charp name. Likewise, when you descend chromatically, you call the notes by their flat name.

Ex.
Ascending: F F# G G# A A# B
Descending: B Bb A Ab G Gb F


Ah, thought it might be something like that. The only thing that threw me off that track was - if you're playing in A and modulate up a half step would it then be correct to write the key as A#? You would then have double sharps. (Which I have seen before they're kind of like an x with little blocks on the end of each arm right)
Si
#9
Quote by adr11iano
hey, ive been wanting to learn the chords in each key, and came across this:

http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/chords/chordchart.htm

my problem is, isnt F# and Gb the same? so why have they each got their own key according to this? is it a mistake?



well they are the same pitch, but what your dealing with is a system where things must be named a certain way to remain consistent.

your standard 7 note diatonic scale consists of 7 individual notes all based off of a different letter.

so for G major you want:

G A B C D E F#

not:

G A B C D E Gb (this way you have 2 G's which you don't want)
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#10
Continuing my other post, you want to be practical when you do this. For instance, if you're playing in G and modulate up a half step, my other post would tell you to write your new ke as G#. There is no key signature for G#, so you would use Ab instead.

While this may cause some confusion, you can assume that a musician reading music with such a key change is good enough to recognize the rule bending as necessary.