#1
so i have this book and i have a question.

All the exercises doesn't exactly involve playing. Am i supposed to incorporate these exercises into my current practicing? That makes no sense because if I;m doing the exercises, which is to have no tension and only use the muscle needed, with my current way of practicing, which is praticng technique, arent they going to "cancel" each other out? like whats the point of doing those excersizes in the book if im going to practice the way i do anyways?
#2
yes use the technique in the book while playing. Im pretty sure otherwise ya, it would be dumb.
#6
^ i dont use my arm, i use my elbow to move from sting to string and wrist to pick. do i start over or i just keep doing the excersizes and let it slowly creep into my own practicing?
#8
THis will probably make it more clear?

1. How many times do i do these exercises?
2. How do i know when can i stop doing these exercises?
3. Do i do these exercises along with my current technical exercises?
4. Or do i only do these exercises?
#9
The method is not something you practice 'on the side', it's a way to play guitar. You can't combine this and something else. You either follow the instructions or you don't. You practice your licks and riffs or whatever using the methods discussed in the book. Not "ok I'm done practicing this tension tension ****, HURF DURF TIEM 2 PLAY EXERCISES"

Also, you say 'these exercises' but nobody except those who've read the book has a clue what in the blue hell you're talking about.
#10
Quote by Vomit Rapist
The method is not something you practice 'on the side', it's a way to play guitar. You can't combine this and something else. You either follow the instructions or you don't. You practice your licks and riffs or whatever using the methods discussed in the book. Not "ok I'm done practicing this tension tension ****, HURF DURF TIEM 2 PLAY EXERCISES"

Also, you say 'these exercises' but nobody except those who've read the book has a clue what in the blue hell you're talking about.


Hurf durf?

He's got a good point, we have no idea (at least I don't) what these exercises are, or what they are meant to do. That makes it kinda hard to help out.
Livin' Easy, Livin' Free
#11
its hard to explain but ill give an example.

The book teaches you how to downpick the "correct way" but to do that you must have no tension. so pretty much you lay your pick agaisnt the string and let your arm's weight push agaisnt the string and try to relax in that position.

another one is to lift your left forearm but very slowly and make sure the shoulder does not raise at all and then fret the low e string on the 10th fret but only halfway, then release then do it again and then you fret it all the way and relax in that position.
#12
Quote by shtiming
its hard to explain but ill give an example.

The book teaches you how to downpick the "correct way" but to do that you must have no tension. so pretty much you lay your pick agaisnt the string and let your arm's weight push agaisnt the string and try to relax in that position.

another one is to lift your left forearm but very slowly and make sure the shoulder does not raise at all and then fret the low e string on the 10th fret but only halfway, then release then do it again and then you fret it all the way and relax in that position.


Well, until they become natural, I'd do them once or twice, maybe before and after regular practice, once they become second nature, don't even bother.

Really, from the way it sounds these are things you should focus on while practicing, rather than practicing totally separate.
Livin' Easy, Livin' Free
#13
don't be worried about "starting from scratch" with your technique. it's not really scratch and it won't take as long as learning how to play to guitar again.

i don't know the exact details of these exercises, but i think you should definitely incorporate them into/ combine them with your current exercises. e.g. if there's something in that book about how to fret notes and how to down pick/up pick, then turn the metronome down to 40 and play through your exercises playing a note for every click of the metronome. keep doing that until it becomes second nature and always double check that you are actually doing what these exercises in guitar principles are telling you to do. that way you are applying what the book is trying to teach you while also practicing other things (scales, improvising, song writing, chords, etc.)
#14
In short, doing those exercises will create very specific improvements. If you do the relaxed down pick exercise you'll notice an improvement in your downpicking and general lack of tension. The question isn't really when to stop them but what to learn from them - focus, patience, relaxation. The exercises apply to your playing by improving very small aspects of it by a very large degree.

Building the wall one solid brick at a time, if you will.

Quote by shtiming
its hard to explain but ill give an example.


I don't think your explanation was bad, I think you got jumped a bit...

Sriusly gais tri 2 halp liek.
#15
Quote by shtiming
its hard to explain but ill give an example.

The book teaches you how to downpick the "correct way" but to do that you must have no tension. so pretty much you lay your pick agaisnt the string and let your arm's weight push agaisnt the string and try to relax in that position.

another one is to lift your left forearm but very slowly and make sure the shoulder does not raise at all and then fret the low e string on the 10th fret but only halfway, then release then do it again and then you fret it all the way and relax in that position.


You can certainly incorporate the picking exercises into whatever else you practice.

The other exercise is to open your awareness of being relaxed and how little
effort and work is required to fret a note. If that feels completely alien to how you
currently feel when you play, that's good. The contrast between how you feel
in reality vs how it COULD feel has entered your awareness.

The exercises are designed to do different things. Maybe you shoud reread the part
about tools, awareness, etc...