#1
So ive been studying alot of music theory this summer and I have learned alot. But when I pick up my guitar, I find that even though I know the theory, I have no clue how to apply it. My phrasing is so bad. I was hoping that learning theory would make it easier for me to impovise and make original music, but when I play it doesnt sound very musical. It feels like the music is coming from my hands and not my creative mind. What can I do to turn this music theory into music.

I've been trying to teach myself guitar for too long. I think its about time I get a teacher.
#2
one way i do it learn patterns to mix up the sequence in which you play the notes.
depending on your genre if you play metal or jazz you can learn make up different chord progressions with arpeggios on top in harmony or in the same tone, whatever.
thats a good start, another way to is to learn songs and learn the key and instead of learning on tab try to figure it out by ear, also take ideas from songs and write or jam on riffs that could be derived off them as a start.
#3
Theory is great, and it helps you in composing a lot. But don't sit down and say "I'm gonna write a riff that follows this and only this." Music is about creativity and only creativity.
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#4
Quote by Mullen2105
one way i do it learn patterns to mix up the sequence in which you play the notes.
depending on your genre if you play metal or jazz you can learn make up different chord progressions with arpeggios on top in harmony or in the same tone, whatever.
thats a good start, another way to is to learn songs and learn the key and instead of learning on tab try to figure it out by ear, also take ideas from songs and write or jam on riffs that could be derived off them as a start.

Well when I learn songs I know the key because I read sheet music. Thats another thing I decided to learn this summer. I took french horn in band last year and learned how to count and read music.

I think a microphone would help me out alot, so that I can record some chord progressions and improvise over them. Where can I get a relatively cheap mic/recording device?
#5
Quote by greekorican5
Well when I learn songs I know the key because I read sheet music. Thats another thing I decided to learn this summer. I took french horn in band last year and learned how to count and read music.

I think a microphone would help me out alot, so that I can record some chord progressions and improvise over them. Where can I get a relatively cheap mic/recording device?


Just buy a loop pedal. Those things are infinitely useful.
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Best theory lesson EVER!
#6
Sounds like you need some ear training. This site has an excellent ear trainer among other things.

Also, yes, play over chord progressions. Know how each note in sounds over each chord in a key. You will gradually get more and more fluent with your note choice.
#7
loop pedals are kinda pricey and I don't understand how to use them. I'm just looking for something that i can plug into my computer and record my playing. Where should i look?
#8
If you just want backing tracks, you can find plenty online or make your own in Guitar Pro. Just to record yourself, a piece-of-**** sub-$20 computer mic will do the trick, though it probably won't sound too nice.
#9
Quote by grampastumpy
If you just want backing tracks, you can find plenty online or make your own in Guitar Pro. Just to record yourself, a piece-of-**** sub-$20 computer mic will do the trick, though it probably won't sound too nice.

Actually I have a ****ty computer mic, but i can't figure out why it won't work. Nothing appears to be wrong with. I tried updating the drivers on it, and it doesnt fix the problem. Any ideas?
#11
It takes some time to absorb music theory to where you can see, more and more,
where it fits into your playing and how it can give you ideas for your playing.
Just keep learning various aspects of it and practice them on the guitar. It won't
seem very musical, but your mind will retain it and eventually it will figure out how
to apply it.

If you're trying to improvise and incorporate theory, I'd advise limiting your theory
application to some very basic progressions and just keep doing them over & over.
Focus on getting your theory mojo working on just one thing. The 12 bar blues
progression or the ii-V-I progression would be good choices.
#12
Quote by grampastumpy
What program are you using?

sound recorder. the one that comes in accessories.
#13
i don't know how to help you, but i know EXACTLY how you feel. i'm in the same predicament.
i feel like a flea trying to describe an elephant
#14
Quote by greekorican5
sound recorder. the one that comes in accessories.
I just tried to check, and evidently, despite having Windows I don't have it...Well what I'd recommend is downloading Audacity(free). In the upper right corner there's a dropdown box to choose what input to use. Either you have your mic plugged into the wrong place on your computer or your computer has selected the wrong input to record with by default. In the dropdown box, "Microphone" or something should be an option.