#1
I have a massive gig coming up on Saturday and there’s a small problem with my strat I’d like to sort before then. Here are the pics...






I haven’t had this guitar long (American Deluxe), probably about six months. About a month and a half ago, I put 10s on the guitar for the first time (I presume they were fitted with 9s) and I noticed it pulls up at the bridge (its a floating bridge) a lot. At the time I thought nothing of it because it still sounded fine, but now I’ve realized its sticking out quite a bit and it sounds and feels a bit awkward when I use the higher frets.

Before I do this, I just want to check if it’s the right thing to do. I’m going to put an extra spring in the back – will this solve matters? Also, how should I do it? De-tune before adding the spring or just shove it on there?

Cheers,
Tom
#2
throwing in a spring would help...also, you could tighten those two screws a little to pull the bridge down. (the two screws that hold the spring plate to the body).
#3
tighten the screws but not til the bridge is level, as tightening the screws will make the tuning go sharp, so you will need to re-tune,

tighen the screws so the bridge goes to about halfway to level, and then tune the guitar and the bridge should be level, but may need some fine adjustments, just remember to re-tune each time you alter the spring tension
#4
whats wrong with the floating bridge? my strats like that . more variety ?
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#5
Quote by Tomaz24
I have a massive gig coming up on Saturday and there’s a small problem with my strat I’d like to sort before then. Here are the pics...






I haven’t had this guitar long (American Deluxe), probably about six months. About a month and a half ago, I put 10s on the guitar for the first time (I presume they were fitted with 9s) and I noticed it pulls up at the bridge (its a floating bridge) a lot. At the time I thought nothing of it because it still sounded fine, but now I’ve realized its sticking out quite a bit and it sounds and feels a bit awkward when I use the higher frets.

Before I do this, I just want to check if it’s the right thing to do. I’m going to put an extra spring in the back – will this solve matters? Also, how should I do it? De-tune before adding the spring or just shove it on there?

Cheers,
Tom



Hi mate, I have had my USA Strat for about 6 months and i put 11's on it and it pulled the bridge up quite a lot.

I blocked off the trem completely by cutting a block of wood and slotting it in behind the floating tremolo.

The metal bit you put your strings through, in the last picture, jam a bit of wood in there between the tremolo where you put your strings through and the body of the guitar.
Make sure its nice and tight!

I did this 2 weeks ago and it doesnt move now, and stays in tune better.
#6
you also have to adjust the intonation when changing string gauge
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#7
otherwise there will be a kinda 'waving' sound at the higher frets
Dean ML79F w/ Dimarzio X2N
Peavey Star
Fender Sonoran
Fender CD 140S12

Quote by Jastul
if you want it to sound really dirty just rub some dirt on your amp...
#8
Nothing wrong with a floating bridge is there? That is "floating" quite high and looks mildly strained though like someones holding the whammy on it.
#9
Tune every string down (doesn't matter to what, you just need loose strings so they don't snap)
Tighten the screws, the bridge will go down
Tune and intonate

Don't change stringe gauge without intonating, especially not before a gig. :P
You might have to repeat the first two steps.
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#10
Argh. It's looking might complicated - I don't want to mess anything up right before a gig.
I may do the gig then adjust these things as they're very minor.

Just out of interest - does everyone here do all these things themselves? Intonation, Action, Adjusting the Bridge, Truss Road adjustments? I've never learnt how to approach any of them.
#11
It's not complicated at all. Just tighten the screws a bit, tune, and repeat if necessary.

No offense, but if you're going to be playing $1k guitars and performing in a gigging band, you should at least know how to take care of these little "common sense of guitar maintenance" details. I'd advise looking online or getting a book on setups just to get a basic idea of how to take care of your own gear. Makes things much easier down the road.
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#12
Quote by slayer89

No offense, but if you're going to be playing $1k guitars and performing in a gigging band, you should at least know how to take care of these little "common sense of guitar maintenance" details. I'd advise looking online or getting a book on setups just to get a basic idea of how to take care of your own gear. Makes things much easier down the road.


None taken. I've always been meaning to get around to these things, but stupidly, I never have. I just practiced adjusting the intonation on a very crappy PRS copy and it went alright. I'll probably try on a Squire next and then if that goes well, I'll try it with my Fender.

Just so I know, does adjusting intonation have any effect on anything else, such as fret buzz?

Also, in what order should I go about doing all these things on my Fender?
#13
Quote by Tomaz24
None taken. I've always been meaning to get around to these things, but stupidly, I never have. I just practiced adjusting the intonation on a very crappy PRS copy and it went alright. I'll probably try on a Squire next and then if that goes well, I'll try it with my Fender.

Just so I know, does adjusting intonation have any effect on anything else, such as fret buzz?

Also, in what order should I go about doing all these things on my Fender?

De-tune -> put the bridge down -> intonate -> tune back up.

Or something like that.
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#14
Quote by Tomaz24

Also, in what order should I go about doing all these things on my Fender?


It's just the intonation and the bridge right?

You should start with the bridge. As other people have already pointed out it's just a matter of tightening the two big screws in the back a little bit and retuning. It's important to retune frequently because otherwise you might over do it (meaning you would have to loosen the screws again.

When you have the bridge set up the way you want it you can start adjusting the intonation. Just make sure that when you adjust it the strings on the guitar are still relatively fresh/new.

Intonation is easily adjusted on a bridge like that. Use a screw driver to adjust the six big screws coming out the back of the saddle.

If you don't really know how to adjust the intonation, here's a quick guide:

1)get an electronic tuner (with a needle or something else that let's you know the exact pitch of the string)
2)tune the string (make sure it's stretched in etc.)
3)hit a harmonic on the 12th fret
4)with the tuner, compare that note to the fretted note at the 12th fret
5)they should be exactly the same. If they're not, adjust the big screw (which i mentioned before) a little untill they are.
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#15
Quote by Lil Macker
De-tune -> put the bridge down -> intonate -> tune back up.

Or something like that.

How exactly would you intonate with it de-tuned?
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#16
Quote by apollo66
How exactly would you intonate with it de-tuned?


yeh thats what i was wondering lol.
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#17
So just to clarify - adding an extra spring is a no no? And I should just tighten the two bolts on the bridge? (I never use the trem)
#18
Adding another spring is not a no-no.

You could either tighten the bolts, put in another spring, or swap out the other springs for stiffer ones.
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Gear:
Gibson LP Studio
Fender Blues Deluxe Reissue
Avatar G212H (1xG12H30 1xAlnico Gold)
TS-9 Screamer
Boss Tu-2
Line6 X2-XDS Plus

The Band
#19
I think I've managed it. I tightened the two screws on the bridge so it's not pulling up so much anymore, and then I adjusted the intonation (although it didn't need much).

I was a bit worried when I tuned-up, because it seemed to go out pretty quickly. But I think it's getting better now, presumibly it's just because the tension has changed. The upper-frets are buzzing a little, I can't tell whether it's more or less than they did before, but the overall setup seems to be fine. So I'm set for my gig.

Really appreciate the help guys. Cheers.
#20
just tighten the screws, but de-tune first.
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#21
Quote by Sakattack75
just tighten the screws, but de-tune first.


I've never detuned before adjusting the springs.

Sure the strings go slightly sharp, but it's nothing they can't handle.

The extra pressure put on by the slightly higher spring tension on a floating trem guitar has the same effect as one of the strings breaking.
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