#1
I understand chord progressions, and how sus/add chords are made up. Let's not get stuck arguing about that.

I was looking at the middle part of Master Of Puppets, where the chord progression is I-VII-VI-IV-V in E minor.

However, the C(VI) has an added ninth, and the A's(IV) second is suspended. I know James plays them just because they sound good (he had no knowledge of theory at the time), but are there any theoretical reasons why these chords work?
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#2
Hm, I'm not entirely sure about it, but I read about sus chords somewhere. In classical music, they were often used to relieve tension, because certain notes pulled better than just the normal chords of the progression.

E.g. G - D sounds a little flat, so Gsus2 would be added, meaning the A in Gsus2 would pull to the A in D (DF#A). I think.
#3
Sus chords do not have a 3rd expressed. This is why they are ambiguous to both major and minor keys.

I'll assume you realise that the 3rd in a chord defines that chord to be major or minor.
#4
I'll assume you realise that the 3rd in a chord defines that chord to be major or minor.

Yeah, but I never realised sus2's didn't have one.
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#5
The reason why you get sus 2 and sus 4 chords is because the 3rd of the chord has been replaced with either a major 2 or perfect 4th respectively.
#6
Yeah, I can see that now. I'm trying to figure out the move from Cadd9 to Asus2 now.

Cadd9 is CEGD, to Asus2 which is ABE.
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Last edited by J.A.M at Jul 24, 2008,
#8
You can also get 7sus4 chords if you'd like to take the theory behind these further?
#9
Hmm, this is beginning to make sense now.

The Cadd9's 9th is a D, Dmaj is the chord before it, making the change smoother. But I still can't see why the sus2 is used.
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#10
don't want to hi-jack the thread, but can you have minor add 9/11/13 etc chords?

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#11
Yeah, why not?

A minor would be ACEB for Am add9.
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#12
Quote by J.A.M
Hmm, this is beginning to make sense now.

The Cadd9's 9th is a D, Dmaj is the chord before it, making the change smoother. But I still can't see why the sus2 is used.

Why? For variety. Usually though, the Dsus 4 is usually used.
#13
I've played the Cadd9-Asus2 transition, and it sounds better than Cadd9-Am; the third doesn't make the chord have the same sound as the add9.
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#14
Quote by metallicafan616
don't want to hi-jack the thread, but can you have minor add 9/11/13 etc chords?


Yes. If you're calling them with an 'add' then it's just simply a triad with the 'added' note of choice.

So in this case you're talking minor add chords.

R b3 5 add " "
#15
In a G Major chord, the 3rd would be B right? So if I made that a 2, would that be A? It isn't really possible to do a Gsus2 or any barre chord involving a sus2, is it? I know with a Sus4 it's easy, but Sus2 is a new shape right?
#16
Quote by fob12
In a G Major chord, the 3rd would be B right? So if I made that a 2, would that be A? It isn't really possible to do a Gsus2 or any barre chord involving a sus2, is it? I know with a Sus4 it's easy, but Sus2 is a new shape right?


Well, it's possible with G-shape barre chords, but they aren't the easiest chords to finger.
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