#1
I'm currently playing with a les paul, and I was wondering when chugging on the low E, do you guys have your hand "floating" above the bridge, or have it resting somewhere on the bridge?

Ive been playing some songs lately that require un-palm muted E string tremolo picking and I dont know whats the best option. If I rest my wrist on the bridge, the guitar kind of shakes, but if I float it above, I see myself using my elbow to pick fast instead of my wrist.
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#2
I usually rest my hand on the bridge, but as always, it's up to you. What do you find comfiest?

Actually, after reading that last line again, I don't think you should ever be using your elbow instead of your wrist. That's bad technique.
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#3
i usually rest my hand just behind/on the bridge but only a little...so it doesn't mute the string
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#4
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
I usually rest my hand on the bridge, but as always, it's up to you. What do you find comfiest?

Actually, after reading that last line again, I don't think you should ever be using your elbow instead of your wrist. That's bad technique.



yeah I just find it weird to try and pick fast without my hand resting on some part of the bridge for some reason. If its floating my technique and picking will be slow and sloppy as ****. But I do have it floating whenever I strum something so I dont know.
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#5
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
I usually rest my hand on the bridge, but as always, it's up to you. What do you find comfiest?

Actually, after reading that last line again, I don't think you should ever be using your elbow instead of your wrist. That's bad technique.


+1

Basically answers your question. Use your wrist. Elbow is too much movement and it looks really awkward
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#6
If you decide to float, then you can always support your hand slightly with your ring and pinky just sitting on the scratch plate - and this is not classed as anchoring.

I play a Strat tho. Have never played a Gibson.
#7
Quote by liquidknowledg4
yeah I just find it weird to try and pick fast without my hand resting on some part of the bridge for some reason. If its floating my technique and picking will be slow and sloppy as ****.


The reason you find it wierd and sloppy is because you don't have control of
your pick. It's completely possible to have as much control without resting your
hand, but generally that requires working at it.
#8
Quote by edg
The reason you find it wierd and sloppy is because you don't have control of
your pick. It's completely possible to have as much control without resting your
hand, but generally that requires working at it.


The only time I ever rest my hand is if I want to palm mute. Other than that, when picking I tend to use my ring and pinky for support (if I'm on the low fat strings).

If it's anything between the G and top E, then my hand tends to gravitate and come to rest on the body and low strings. My ring and pinky tend to tuck in at this point.
#9
Quote by mdc
If you decide to float, then you can always support your hand slightly with your ring and pinky just sitting on the scratch plate - and this is not classed as anchoring.

I play a Strat tho. Have never played a Gibson.


Wrong. That is anchoring, and to be honest, I think it's worse than just resting your palm on the bridge. Having ANY part of your arm touching the guitar for support is anchoring. Even when you think it's just resting there.

I find that unless I need to palm mute, I play alot better with my arm floating. It takes a while t get used to, but once you do, it will be worth it.
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#10
Quote by Gelato
Wrong. That is anchoring, and to be honest, I think it's worse than just resting your palm on the bridge. Having ANY part of your arm touching the guitar for support is anchoring. Even when you think it's just resting there.


ok the part about having your hand/arm being used for support IS anchoring is correct. However just having your hand/arm touch the guitar while playing is not. you're going to inevitably touch your guitar somewhere at some point in time.