#1
I'm almost stuck on ideas here. Let's say you're jamming with someone in A, and he's playing a rather soft rhythm, what licks/ideas would you use? I know accenting the root notes are nice as well as perfect vibratos, but anything else would be nice.

Also any other styles of using the major scale, if you can think of some, thanks.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#2
well, you say accent the root notes, but you can get a more interesting sound by accenting the 3rd and 5th , and possibly the 7th of the chords.
Gibson SG Standard
Ibanez S2170FB
Peavey JSX
Marshall 1960A
TEXAS A&M
#4
Sweet. I almost forget modes.. but I'll give it a shot. Thanks.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#5
Watch Marty Friedman's Melodic Control.
Call me Batman.
#6
Root notes are boring tbh. You don't want to overuse them. Try to land more on thirds and sevenths on the down beats. They're more interesting notes.
#7
Pay attention to the chords! If he's playing a C#m chord, you probably won't want to hang on a D. Over the same chord, a B might sound real perty-like. At first you might want to just play chord tones to get a hang of how to keep up with them, later throwing in extensions and other degrees(7ths, 9ths and beyooooond). You should know how you want to harmonically interact with the chords.

Also, +1 to confusius about root notes. People seem to confuse "consonant" with "good". Consonant only means there won't be any tension, and after a while it'll just feel like you're not going anywhere. Tension and dissonance make a piece of music MUCH more dynamic. Though I wouldn't really call root notes boring.
#8
All right, I'm still stumped on progressions. I need to find a backing track of some sort that's NOT too technical. I found one but it's f*cking hard to keep up if the keys change every measure (four keys). I mostly play one or two keys, to start with I guess.

Any good backing track sites?
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#10
you can use appregios of the chords the other person is playing. those are always good to stick too.
#11
Quote by Freepower
Yeah, guitarbt.com.

Read lesson 4 in my sig.

The only problem with guitarbt.com now is you have to pay for them..
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#13
If you're playing a pure A major progression, A D E D A D E E7 or something, you would use the A major scale with some appropriate chromaticism, of course. A Lydian and A Mixolydian would sound weird over that.

If you're more comfortable soloing in minor keys, solo in the relative minor. While this is technically incorrect, the notes of the A major scale over an A major progression is always the A major scale and not one the relative minor, it may help your thought process and ability to navigate the fretboard,

However, remember that you're NOT playing in F# minor!

Edit: You may find that your "F#m licks" resolve to F#. Make a point of resolving them to A.