#2
yes, but you have to know if its a major or minor third, and what kind of 7th it is too, it would be easier to find a key that they fit in and play in key.
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#3
The less notes are in the chord, the more freedom you have. Power chords have the root, and a major 5. The rest, is really up to you on how you want to make the song sound.
#4
Quote by fob12
The less notes are in the chord, the more freedom you have. Power chords have the root, and a major 5. The rest, is really up to you on how you want to make the song sound.


Note: There's no such thing as a 'major 5'. A fifth is the same for both major and minor chords, and is called a perfect fifth.
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Hmm judging from your pic you'd fit in more with a fat busted tribute.
#5
fob 12
if you're soloing over a powerchord it doesnt matter about the 3rd interval because a power chord does not contain a 3rd so is neither major or minor
#6
If there is a bass in the mix that will usualy determine the direction of the music key wise.
#7
Quote by duncang
Note: There's no such thing as a 'major 5'. A fifth is the same for both major and minor chords, and is called a perfect fifth.

Yeah I was thinking about then when I posted... I wasn't sure though. Thanks.
#8
Quote by professorlamp
fob 12
if you're soloing over a powerchord it doesnt matter about the 3rd interval because a power chord does not contain a 3rd so is neither major or minor


Yes, but what he means by that (I think) is, if I'm playing in the key of C Maj I can't play the 3rd interval for E Major, cause that would be G#, and G# is not in the key of C Maj, it would have to be a flattened 3rd
#10
Look at what the power chords imply. If your chords are E5, F#5, G#5, A5, B5, and C#5(though not necessarily in that order), 99% of the time, that points to E major(or C# minor). Just because power chords don't have thirds doesn't mean they don't imply harmony. If you were to have an E5 B5 C#5 A5 progression and play E Lydian, B Phrygian dominant, C# Half-Whole Diminished and A Dorian, it would sound pretty dissonant because of how strongly those chords still imply E major. Power chords aren't as "liberating" as some people seem to think.