#1
I have a question about harmonizing two melodies:

Is making the second melody a M3rd above the base melody the only interval with which to harmonize? (sorry if i'm posing the question in a wierd way)
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#2
No. You could use any interval to harmonize. Each will give a different sound and create a unique effect. Try some intervals and experiment.

Try using intervals that stay in key also - rather than all Maj3rds some will be minor.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Jul 24, 2008,
#3
Absolutely not. You can harmonize with any interval in any combination. However, the common harmonizations are:

Diatonic Thirds
Diatonic Sixths
Perfect Fifths
And sometimes Perfect Fourths.
#4
Thank you.

I wasn't sure about the diatonic part, but thanks for clearing that up.
Proud Owner of a Fender Jazz 24 V

Private Simmons of the Red vs. Blue club. PM Fret13 to join.

Things to come:
Carvin or Trace-elliot rig
EBS Valvedrive (Newest edition )
#5
Generally speaking, the harmony should be in key as well. BGC is right about the common harmonies. Sometimes though, you wanna look beyond just the melody notes and think of the overall harmony. If you're in C Major and you come across a D melody note over a G chord, harmonizing in thirds would result in an F, which would alter the chord's quality(make it a G7) which may not be what you want at all. I would probably elect to harmonize with a G instead as it's already a chord tone. Same thing with a D melody note over say, an Em. A third would give you an F, which might not sound so pleasant over that chord(perhaps a G would be better here too).