#1
so im really getting into flamenco and guys like John Mcglahulin and Paco De lucia. but the problem is i have no clue where to start. does anyone know some chords they use so i can base songs off of them?
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#2
not really any chords, but almost all that stuff has like a whole lot of the phrygian and altered phrygian mode. mess around with those. usually the chords diatonic to those modes can work though. A natural minor is also used quite frequently. and by the way, Paco is awesome. u should listen to one of his songs called Almoraima. its pretty sweet
#3
chord progression: Am-Dm-C-Bb-A and throw in sum harmonic minors


http://members.aol.com/BuleriaChk/p...eory/Theory.pdf

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and one more thing im pretty sure flamenco is based around that you as the guitarist must accompany a flamenco dancer, keep that in mind
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#4
Flamenco is all about getting the various rhythm timings right firstly. Buy yourself a book on flamenco [it's too deep to go into here] and try to get a flamenco guitar as they are made from very different woods than classicals. I have a loverly Spanish Vincent Sanchez [1930] that has a good attack without too much sustain. That is what you want ... little sustain and lots of attack! Classical guitars just don't hack it. They have too much sustain from heavy woods.
Last edited by Akabilk at Aug 7, 2008,
#5
Flamenco is all about getting the various rhythm timings right firstly.



This, if you don't have compas it's not flamenco.
#6
Compás is the Spanish word for metre and time signature in classical music theory. In flamenco, besides having these meanings, it also refers to the rhythmic cycle, or layout, of a palo or flamenco style. When performing flamenco it is important to feel the rhythm — the compás — rather than mechanically count the beats. In this way, flamenco is similar to jazz or blues where performers seem to simply 'feel' the rhythm.
#8
Compás is the Spanish word for metre and time signature in classical music theory. In flamenco, besides having these meanings, it also refers to the rhythmic cycle, or layout, of a palo or flamenco style. When performing flamenco it is important to feel the rhythm — the compás — rather than mechanically count the beats. In this way, flamenco is similar to jazz or blues where performers seem to simply 'feel' the rhythm.



You have a neat keyboard that has el acento para compás. Compá' if you're from Sevilla.
#9
...I wish I could find that old thread that I believe was in this part of the forum. This one guy, can't remember the name, put up a good amount of information on Flamenco. Anyone know what I am talking about? I'm sure it would help TS out.