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#1
I know tempo is really important when making a song. How do I use it?
Last edited by fob12 at Jul 25, 2008,
#2
this is perhaps the most nonspecific thread ever.
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#3
What do you need help with again? Note that I'm still a theory n00b but I'll try to help if anyway I can

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#4
I meant with music, not a specific song. :P But I mean how would I use tempo, to get my guitar solo the way I want it? Stuff like that. How do I mix timing in the formula for good music?
#5
* facepalm *

you use tempo by setting a speed for the song, which is the purpose of tempo. im thinking this maybe should go in the guitar basics forum.
#7
Do you mean you want to put different tempos within the song?
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#8
The tempo is how fast the song is. You don't really use the tempo while writing the music, it just describes how fast the song is after you've written it - usually so the performer knows how fast to play it.

If all your songs are the same tempo then try and write slower songs or faster songs.
#9
Quote by fob12
I know that. I don't know how to word my question.

then we can't really answer a question you don't know how to ask.
#11
Tempo is the speed of the song. If your beat is 1 long pause 2 long pause 3 long pause 4 long pause 1 then you're at a slow tempo. If your tempo is 1 short pause 2 short pause 3 short pause 4 short pause 1 then your at a fast tempo.

Quote by jsmusicbox
Are you asking about 4/4 or 3/4 time signatures?

Don't bring up anything but 4/4 time.

TS, assume that all tempos go 1 2 3 4 for now. You can learn about more complex stuff later, but let's focus on the basics, first. 4/4 is considered "common time," and is the most common and therefore easiest to use.
#12
tempo, is te speed of your song, it can't really help you solo, but if your notes aren't in time, you sound like crap.
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#13
I mean how do I use tempo properly in, well mostly improvising so that I don't go fast at an inappropriate time or too slow the whole song? I mean, staying with the beat just using tempo of my improvisation to make it interesting.
#14
Quote by fob12
I mean how do I use tempo properly in, well mostly improvising so that I don't go fast at an inappropriate time or too slow the whole song? I mean, staying with the beat just using tempo of my improvisation to make it interesting.
I'm sorry, but what are you talking about? Generally, you don't want to use your actual tempo to "make it interesting" because you're gonna want to solo at the same tempo as everything else. You can always use more interesting rhythms though. Use a lot of syncopation, accents on weak beats, etc. if you want your playing to be more interesting rhythmically. However, this has nothing to do with the tempo.
#15
tempo just means how fast a song is. Battery by Metallica has a fast tempo, Hurt by Johnny Cash has a slow tempo. Tempo has little to do with soloing. the phrase "using tempo" doesnt make sense.
#16
Quote by fob12
I mean how do I use tempo properly in, well mostly improvising so that I don't go fast at an inappropriate time or too slow the whole song? I mean, staying with the beat just using tempo of my improvisation to make it interesting.

Well I have to aree that the question itself is very vauge...its almost like your pointing in a room full of people and yelling "hey you".

But tempo, is the speed of a song. Say you clap your hands once every second, then the tempo would be 60 BPM (beats per minute). And I know for a fact that tapping your foot can help your playing skill greatly by not allowing you to go to fast or to slow while playing...
Other than that your going to have to be just a tad bit more specific.
Hope this helped at all lol.

Skylar
#17
I think you mean rhythm. When you say changing tempo in a solo, do you just mean using different rhythms?
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#18
Quote by aetherspear
I think you mean rhythm. When you say changing tempo in a solo, do you just mean using different rhythms?

I guess you can say that. What I'm saying is, how do you know when you should use a burst of speed, then keep it slow, and stuff like that. I assumed that tempo on your part played into that. Phrasing as it's called I think?
#19
Quote by fob12
I mean how do I use tempo properly in, well mostly improvising so that I don't go fast at an inappropriate time or too slow the whole song? I mean, staying with the beat just using tempo of my improvisation to make it interesting.

I'm reading this as something like - How do I incorporate faster playing while maintaining the same tempo?

Just practice man practice practice practice. Experiment and try different things.

Set your Metronome - maybe 80bpm.

Then play a four note melody just using quarter notes. One note per click.

In all exercises it's important that you're hitting your beats and not losing or gaining time against the metronome. Good rhythm is essential for sounding good. Even lead guitarists need good rhythm. Listeners won't mind the odd bum note but off timing will make them walk away. I have seen this most often when a player tries completely loses the beat by trying to increase the intensity of a solo by playing faster.

When you can do that with consistency use the same four notes on the clicks but start using eighth notes by adding one note in between. You'll be playing twice as many notes in the same space of time.

Then bring in eighth note triplets. This is where you will be playing three even notes for each click of the metronome. Once again use the same notes on the clicks accenting beats one and three but you'll fill in between with two even notes.

Then introduce sixteenth notes. Here you'll be playing four notes per click and for a real challenge try sixteenth note triplets this will equate to six notes per click.

This will really impact your playing when you practice changing between the different note values while maintining the same bpm on your metronome.

Start as slow as you need to in order to complete an exercise flawlessly. Gradually increase to find the highest tempo you can comfortably do the exercise without making a single mistake and mark down the bpm. Practice it there for a while to be sure you've got it, then push it up one or two notches and practice there for a few minutes before bringing it back down 10 bpms and gradually increasing. Your playing should be even and you should always be hitting your beats on the head. Practice in set times say 10-20 mins then a break. Don't strain yourself. If you feel pain in your hands take a break or you could do serious long term damage to yourself.

When you are playing - the song will dictate when you need to increase the intensity. You should be able to feel when it's time to turn it up a notch and keep in mind faster playing isn't the only way to do this but it can be very effective if done well.

Then try introducing rests and accenting different beats to vary your rhythms.

Good Luck
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Jul 25, 2008,
#20
I'm not 100% sure what you are asking but I get the general idea. Looking through Joe Satriani's tab book noticed his super insano fast stuff is just as many notes as he can fit into a bar. It's like he goes and thinks "start super shred here and end here" but the rhythym of the indivual notes doesn't really matter. Sorry I couldn't help much but your question is pretty vague.
#21
Quote by fob12
I meant with music, not a specific song. :P But I mean how would I use tempo, to get my guitar solo the way I want it? Stuff like that. How do I mix timing in the formula for good music?

Wait now I'm reading it different.

It's all about feeling and artistic vision. If you want your solo to smash the listener in the face you might want to come in on a slow song with a revved up solo laying down mad sixteenth sextuplets but you will need to bring the listener back around by the end of the solo by way of taking them back to where you just before you hit them.

Or you might want to gradually take them up a slow rise and then when you hit the peak you might hold them there for a while with some intense faster licks before coming down the other side. You might bring them down slowly in cotton wool with some soft cuddly licks after the climax or throw them down with some fast descending runs to finish with a sustained root note.

Maybe you'll just plod along with your solo slowly building tension and creating an expectation in the listener that something is going to happen. They might expect a resolve but you hold the note a little longer before whole band jumps into double time and finishes the song with much more energy than it started.

It's all down to you as a musician. There are no set rules but if you create contrast it will have to fit back in with the song, somehow, at some point.
Si
#22
if all the instruments are going at the same speed it shouldn't matter what your tempo is.
#23
Quote by 20Tigers
Wait now I'm reading it different.

It's all about feeling and artistic vision. If you want your solo to smash the listener in the face you might want to come in on a slow song with a revved up solo laying down mad sixteenth sextuplets but you will need to bring the listener back around by the end of the solo by way of taking them back to where you just before you hit them.

Or you might want to gradually take them up a slow rise and then when you hit the peak you might hold them there for a while with some intense faster licks before coming down the other side. You might bring them down slowly in cotton wool with some soft cuddly licks after the climax or throw them down with some fast descending runs to finish with a sustained root note.

Maybe you'll just plod along with your solo slowly building tension and creating an expectation in the listener that something is going to happen. They might expect a resolve but you hold the note a little longer before whole band jumps into double time and finishes the song with much more energy than it started.

It's all down to you as a musician. There are no set rules but if you create contrast it will have to fit back in with the song, somehow, at some point.
Yeah you got my question now. Nice answer too. So it's really just whatever I feel like doing? Is it more like Phrasing that I'm asking here?
#25
Quote by fob12
I mean how do I use tempo properly in, well mostly improvising so that I don't go fast at an inappropriate time or too slow the whole song? I mean, staying with the beat just using tempo of my improvisation to make it interesting.

The beat is the tempo. You dont have to increase the tempo to play fast or to make a mood, you just need musical notation to make it fast slow or as you said "interesting".
Is that what your talking about?
#26
are you meaning to say how do you practice along with a solo to get better at soloing or playing at a certain tempo?
#27
1.Learn how to count time.
2.Tap your foot and count time when you play.

Your questioning of tempo makes me think you need to step back from soloing and go to basics like counting in 4/4 and note durations etc... It will be more benificial then soloing with no clue what your doing. Your confusing tempo of a song with the duration of the notes. 2 songs could be at the same bpm and sound extremly fast or slow depending on note durations.

www.musictheory.net go hear and read about time signatures and note durations.
Last edited by /-\liceNChains at Jul 28, 2008,
#28
I know about tempo and tapping my foot. I can naturally tune in with the tempo and play just fine, but I want to learn what makes the tempo, what that. How you only use the 2 and 4 beats of a 1 2 3 4 tempo for example. How do I use that all differently?
#29
Quote by fob12
I know about tempo and tapping my foot. I can naturally tune in with the tempo and play just fine, but I want to learn what makes the tempo, what that. How you only use the 2 and 4 beats of a 1 2 3 4 tempo for example. How do I use that all differently?

Wth that you'd only play notes on the second and fourth beats, with rests on the first and third.
Once again, what do you know of musical notation?
#30
Quote by Skylargann19
Wth that you'd only play notes on the second and fourth beats, with rests on the first and third.
Once again, what do you know of musical notation?

What is musical notation?
#31
Quote by fob12
What is musical notation?

Things like quarter notes, eigth notes, 16th notes, rests, codas. whole notes half notes...stuff like that.
Its what makes up music. Tempo would be the ground and musical notation would be the house that stands on it.

Does that kind of make sense?
#32
Well, there are a couple of ways to change the speed without actually changing the tempo.

First, you group the notes differently. This is definately the most common.

Second, you could change the time. Ex. 4/4 3/4 6/8 etc. etc. etc. This, I think, is a little more difficult, considering you would have to find just the right time to do it and you have to know how to count in these different times.
#33
Quote by Skylargann19
Things like quarter notes, eigth notes, 16th notes, rests, codas. whole notes half notes...stuff like that.
Its what makes up music. Tempo would be the ground and musical notation would be the house that stands on it.

Does that kind of make sense?
Not really. :/ I just play along with the tempo, but I don't how all that is going on.
#34
Quote by fob12
Not really. :/ I just play along with the tempo, but I don't how all that is going on.

/-\lice in chains was right when he said that you need to go back and learn the basics, jugding from you post in the thread, learning the basics before soloing will help alot. i would recommend getting a teacher.
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#35
Quote by Mr.Cuddles
/-\lice in chains was right when he said that you need to go back and learn the basics, jugding from you post in the thread, learning the basics before soloing will help alot. i would recommend getting a teacher.

What basics specifically? And I can't and don't want to get a teacher. There's nothing I can't learn from a teacher that I can't learn online.
#37
Learn different rhythms. If you are asking how you use the different beats then you want to know about different rhythms.
To start,
Set your metronome and count out rhythms.
Start with basic eighths accenting just the down beats (1 and 3).
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 1 + 2 + 3 + 4

Then try accenting just the backbeat 2 and 4.
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 1 + 2 + 3 + 4

Try counting some offbeat syncopation where you accent the + between the clicks.
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 1 + 2 + 3 + 4
You might get a reggae kind of feel from this.

Then add in some different variations mixing it up a bit for some new rhythms
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +
(Example 1 attached)

Try sixteenth notes as well
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a 1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a

You might introduce some eighth notes triplets
1 2 3 2 2 3 3 2 3 4 2 3

EDIT(Shuffle deleted)

You might spread a rhythm out over 2 bars but be careful about spreading it too far cause without reptition you have not rhythm.

When you are playing you guitar you will bring your rhythm to life by accenting notes through attack, sustain, note selection etc, and will utilise passing notes and rests to keep the flow of the rhythm.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Jul 28, 2008,
#40
Quote by 20Tigers
Learn different rhythms. If you are asking how you use the different beats then you want to know about different rhythms.
To start,
Set your metronome and count out rhythms.
Start with basic eighths accenting just the down beats (1 and 3).
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 1 + 2 + 3 + 4

Then try accenting just the backbeat 2 and 4.
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 1 + 2 + 3 + 4

Try counting some offbeat syncopation where you accent the + between the clicks.
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 1 + 2 + 3 + 4
You might get a reggae kind of feel from this.

Then add in some different variations mixing it up a bit for some new rhythms
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +
(Example 1 attached)

Try sixteenth notes as well
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a 1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a

You might introduce some eighth notes triplets
1 2 3 2 2 3 3 2 3 4 2 3

Heres a basic blues shuffle.
1 2 3 2 2 3 3 2 3 4 2 3 1 2 3 2 2 3 3 2 3 4 2 3

You might spread a rhythm out over 2 bars but be careful about spreading it too far cause without reptition you have not rhythm.

When you are playing you guitar you will bring your rhythm to life by accenting notes through attack, sustain, note selection etc, and will utilise passing notes and rests to keep the flow of the rhythm.
But this is where I get confused. How do I make it sound alive instead of just hitting it after a particular beat?
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