#1
Is sight reading like reading the (official) tablature for a song and then put it away and start playing the song?
#2
Sight reading is when you get the music and just read it straight up. Just by looking as you play. No practice.
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#3
No. Sight reading would be when one plays the song as they read it. And, generally, it refers to sight reading of musical notation -- not TAB.
#4
It is possible to sight read from tab, in so far as your looking at the tab whilst playing, with no previous attempt at learning it.

In TAB terms, i can sight read quite proficiently. Where notation is concerned i can be quite slow, which is something i really must work on.
#5
Sight reading is almost always something you won't already know, because otherwise you could just be working it out by ear.

Also, in higher grades sight reading will usually be small pieces that don't sound natural, so lots of accidentals and odd rythms.

Sight reading is a really good skill to have because it allows you to see any piece of music and be able to play it straight away.
#6
Sight reading, as already stated, is when you read a piece of music without having heard it before. However, you have to read it in standard notation and not any other notation system for it to really be considered sight reading.
#7
It's sight reading whether it is standard notation or guitar tab or any other notation, it is just a matter of being able to sit there and play it on sight. You could theoretically write drums in standard notation (every sound does have a pitch), but I've never seen it done.

The reason that people associate it heavily with standard notation is because it is a technique more predominately used by instruments where standard notation is actually the most convenient notation system or by formally trained musicians that quite often think standard notation is somehow a better way to write music, which is the equivalent of saying something hand written is better than something typed, they still both say the same thing, it just can be situationally be more useful to use one or the other.
#8
Quote by Matheau
You could theoretically write drums in standard notation (every sound does have a pitch), but I've never seen it done.


That's what the percussion clef is for.
#9
I recommend Guitar Freak Workstation with SightReader Master.
It's totally adjustable to the users level and works on reading notes with rhythms. I've looked around and there's nothing for guitar or bass software that deals with sight-reading but this. The download site with some info is www.prolevelguitar.com
PS it does chords as well. From what I can see, you can upgrade the software to a whole bunch of tools I haven't seen before... there's some videos on them.
#10
Quote by VIRUSDETECTED
That's what the percussion clef is for.

x2.
#11
Quote by Matheau
It's sight reading whether it is standard notation or guitar tab or any other notation, it is just a matter of being able to sit there and play it on sight. You could theoretically write drums in standard notation (every sound does have a pitch), but I've never seen it done.

The reason that people associate it heavily with standard notation is because it is a technique more predominately used by instruments where standard notation is actually the most convenient notation system or by formally trained musicians that quite often think standard notation is somehow a better way to write music, which is the equivalent of saying something hand written is better than something typed, they still both say the same thing, it just can be situationally be more useful to use one or the other.

TAB doesn't have rythm so it would be impossible to sight read accurately from.