#1
So you go from the iv to V in a minor key. So in A it would be Dm to E. but in a minor key should the fifth be minor?? does this cadence go out of key? im a little confused.
#2
The use of the V chord in a minor key is extremely common, more so than the use of the v chord. It offers a stronger resolution to the tonic. This is actually the origin (and the purpose) of harmonic minor.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Jul 25, 2008,
#3
^+1

Harmonic Minor has a natural 7th to create a V chord in a minor key.
#4
The V, in your example, is E. E has E, G#, B. The G# isn't in A minor (nor is any other sharp) but a V is still very common.

That is because the G# comes from the harmonic minor scale:
Harmonic Minor (1,2,b3,4,5,b6,7): A,B,C,D,E,F,G#

That G# is the leading tone. When the E chord is played, that G# wants to go up a half-step to the note, A. That tendency to want to go up a half-step for resolution is why the V is used.

By the way, Dissonance is when a note isn't stable and wants to move to a consonant note to resolve (in this case the dissonant tone is G# and A is where it resolves).

“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#5
Quote by Archeo Avis
The use of the V chord in a minor key is extremely common, more so than the use of the v chord. It offers a stronger resolution to the tonic. This is actually the origin (and the purpose) of harmonic minor.
+1

It's not just the dominant fifth chord, some guys would use a minor second degree (ii), a diminished seventh degree (vii0), and even sometimes an augmented flat third degree (III+).
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#6
just a quick note
isn't A Phrygian = A Bb C D E F G A so isn't 4 to 5 = Dm to Edim? It's just the title of the thread threw me.
Si
#7
Quote by 20Tigers
just a quick note
isn't A Phrygian = A Bb C D E F G A so isn't 4 to 5 = Dm to Edim? It's just the title of the thread threw me.
Nah, its only named phrygian cadence because it outlines the phrygian mode.
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#8
Quote by demonofthenight
Nah, its only named phrygian cadence because it outlines the phrygian mode.

how does it outline the phrygian mode?
Si
#9
Quote by 20Tigers
how does it outline the phrygian mode?
That E7 chord usually means phrygian dominant (EDIT:damn thats misleading), because its the fifth degree chord of A minor. This you probably already know, because the fifth mode of harmonic minor is phyrgian dominant.

That D minor chord contains D F A. The defining note in the phrygian mode is the minor second, no other diatonic minor mode uses that interval. The minor second in E phrygian dominant is F. F is in the D minor chord.

EDIT: why are my posts filled with errors?
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Last edited by demonofthenight at Jul 26, 2008,
#10
A harmonic minor = A B C D E F G# A
5th mode = E Phrygian Dominant = E F G# A B C D E

Ah I see iv - V; Dm - E. Okay, but there is a difference between Phrygian and Phrygian Dominant which is why I was confused. Thanks for clearing that up.
Si
#11
Quote by demonofthenight
That E7 chord usually means phrygian dominant (EDIT:damn thats misleading), because its the fifth degree chord of A minor. This you probably already know, because the fifth mode of harmonic minor is phyrgian dominant.

That D minor chord contains D F A. The defining note in the phrygian mode is the minor second, no other diatonic minor mode uses that interval. The minor second in E phrygian dominant is F. F is the D minor chord.

*cough* Locrian *cough*

Yes, the b2 is the defining interval of the Phrygian mode because Locrian's defining interval is the b5. Just felt like bustin' your balls.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#12
Quote by metal4all
*cough* Locrian *cough*

Yes, the b2 is the defining interval of the Phrygian mode because Locrian's defining interval is the b5. Just felt like bustin' your balls.
*cough* "minor mode" *cough*

Goddamnit, thats another error. In this case its a major mode, phrygian dominant is major. Eugh, I CBF editing the post.
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