#1
So I picked up "Let's get it up" by AC/DC a little while ago and I came across something I can't quite grasp:

D/A
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--3--
--2--
--4--
--0--
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To my ears this just doesn't sound correct with the recording, despite the fact that it's written in every single tab I can find on the song. I've played the song with both this chord and a regular D5 power chord, and honestly the D5 sounds better to my ears.

The real question I have is what is the theory behind D/A? I'm assuming it's some kind of cross between an open D and an open A chord, but I'm looking for a more in depth explanation.

Also any advice as to why this chord doesn't seem to go with the recording (as opposed to the D5) would be helpful.
#2
I don't know the song, but to me it looks like the result of blues shuffling using an Asus4.
Quote by lizarday
oh yeah? well larry king the slayer guitarist owns bc rich guitars. (i think)
#3
The notes in the D/A chord are (from high to low) D, A, F#, A...
A normal Dmaj triad is composed of the notes D, F#, A (with D as the bass note)
You'll notice here, however, the bass note is an A. This is where the '/A' comes from; the rest of the notes are comprised of a D chord. (the bass A is also in a D chord, but as i said, its the bass note so therefore theres a /A)

as with why it doesnt right, i dont know, i dont listen to ac/dc and have never heard the song
#4
The D5 might sound better to you because you just might not be able to hear the F# in the D/A in the recording, I don't know the song but because it's AC/DC there's gonna be quite a bit of gain involved.
#6
I'll have to try that heh. I'm going to try adding the F# to the D5 chord when I get home and see if it blends into the song any better:

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--7--
--7--
--7--
--5--
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#7
Are you sure you're firmly picking the D note? When I play it it sounds fine. A lot oftimes beginners will only play the top few strings of a chord, especially 5th chords with added octaves in them. Also, check to make sure you're in tune perfectly, and also turn down the bass on your amp.
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#8
^ I think you mean the bottom few strings?

(bottom = thicker strings, top = thinner)
#9
I know the song altho I haven't heard it in ages. But that chord is right. Angus and Malcolm often played different things, maybe one was playing this chord while the other played a straight D power chord? So you might not hear the F# as much as the other notes.

That same chord shape appears in the second halfof the verse IIRC, except over a B chord:

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-4----5-5----4-
-4----4-4----4-
-4----5-5----4-
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Obviously you can't use the open fifth string here like you could with the D/A.

Getting back to the D/A, that chord shape is real common in rock. Another AC/DC song example that uses that shape would be Rock & Roll Damnation.

If you tune your guitar to open G you can get that same sound anywhere on the neck. A lot of Stones songs use it.
#10
To OP: the initial chord that you had shown us (D/A) is a second inversion of a D Major chord. This simply means that instead of D being the lowest note in the chord, the note A is.
#11
Quote by guitarviz
^ I think you mean the bottom few strings?

(bottom = thicker strings, top = thinner)


Yeah but I mean top as in the higher of the strings; it would be confusing if I had said beginners only pick the bottom fewstrings of the chords.
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#12
Its something AC/DC uses alot is this version of the chord. Its an easy shift from A to this version of D. You keep the A chord barred and add the 3 and 4th frets to it. Guitar pro lists this as a regular D chord (D,A,F#). This version has more bass strings involved than the regular D chord. Its fast shift between the chords so the 5th fret D5 would involve shifting where your hand is on the neck. AC/DC uses the power chord version more with out the 3rd or F#.