#1
Alright, I've benn talking to some guys here and on Youtube, and as the title sugests, I'm thinking about changing the volume pots in my Gibson 61 Reissue SG from 300k (what is in there now) to 500k pots. First off, I always assumed that was what was already in there, but I called Gibson and the confirmed it was the 300k's.

So just a few questions: some people have said doing this makes your tone a bit brighter, others say that because the minimum resistance is still zero (when the know is set to 10), there is no difference, so what is the truth of this?

Second, (the main reason I'm thinking about changing them) is because in order for me to get the clean tone I like, all I do is turn my volume knob on the guitar down. what I'm thinking(and have been told by some), is since there are more positional variables from a zero to 500k resistance, is that the "sweet spot" for my clean tone might not be as touchy, and that volume swells might be a little smoother. Again, I'd like to know your opinions on the matter.

Thanks!
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#2
a 300k at 10 and a 500k at 10 are different unless you have a pot bypass type of pot that when its fully open it bypasses the pot.

when you upgrade your tone will get brighter and you will be able to get the same roll off affect as the 300ks but you will be able to go brighter when your at 10. the difference is that the actual change between the numbers on your knob will be greater on a 500k pot.
ex: going from a 7-8 on a 300k pot will be less of a change than going from 7-8 on a 500k pot. its just more sensitive.
in the end go for it and get either 500k CTS or 500k RS superpots. they are both better than the gibson stock ones. you might also want to change the caps (capacitors) out while your changing stuff in there.
http://mylespaul.com/forums/
for any other questions search those forums, they are really great guys and they know EVERYTHING you will need to know. for pot and cap questions go to the "Tonefreaks section"
#3
Quote by xsouldriverx
a 300k at 10 and a 500k at 10 are different unless you have a pot bypass type of pot that when its fully open it bypasses the pot.

when you upgrade your tone will get brighter and you will be able to get the same roll off affect as the 300ks but you will be able to go brighter when your at 10. the difference is that the actual change between the numbers on your knob will be greater on a 500k pot.
ex: going from a 7-8 on a 300k pot will be less of a change than going from 7-8 on a 500k pot. its just more sensitive.
in the end go for it and get either 500k CTS or 500k RS superpots. they are both better than the gibson stock ones. you might also want to change the caps (capacitors) out while your changing stuff in there.
http://mylespaul.com/forums/
for any other questions search those forums, they are really great guys and they know EVERYTHING you will need to know. for pot and cap questions go to the "Tonefreaks section"


So wait, I'm confused. Is 10 on a 500k pot the equivalent of like a 13 on a 300k pot, or is the overall tone just brighter?

Also, what makes those pots you listed "better"?
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#4
The lower the value, the more bassy it'll sound b/c low values roll off treble freqs to ground more readily than high values. 250k or 300k will sound noticably warmer than 500k. 250k is used to tame the shrillness of single coils and 500k is used to counter the booming bass of humbuckers. You could even go as high as 1M to give humbuckers some bite.
#6
Quote by Invader Jim
The lower the value, the more bassy it'll sound b/c low values roll off treble freqs to ground more readily than high values. 250k or 300k will sound noticably warmer than 500k. 250k is used to tame the shrillness of single coils and 500k is used to counter the booming bass of humbuckers. You could even go as high as 1M to give humbuckers some bite.

Hmmm... well, I quite like the low end I get, but I suppose that's what tone knobs are for.

Like I said though, my main question is about the clean tone thing and about the volume swells.
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#7
Quote by SG Man Forever
Alright, I've benn talking to some guys here and on Youtube, and as the title sugests, I'm thinking about changing the volume pots in my Gibson 61 Reissue SG from 300k (what is in there now) to 500k pots. First off, I always assumed that was what was already in there, but I called Gibson and the confirmed it was the 300k's.
yyyup. 300k on Gibsons with 2 volumes. and linear, not audio taper.

Quote by SG Man Forever
So just a few questions: some people have said doing this makes your tone a bit brighter, others say that because the minimum resistance is still zero (when the know is set to 10), there is no difference, so what is the truth of this?
the resistance in series with the output is zero, but the resistance in parallel with the pickup is the full value of the pot. the parallel resistance works with the internal inductance of the pickup to form a low-pass filter. lower resistance decreases the roll-off frequency.

Quote by SG Man Forever
Second, (the main reason I'm thinking about changing them) is because in order for me to get the clean tone I like, all I do is turn my volume knob on the guitar down. what I'm thinking(and have been told by some), is since there are more positional variables from a zero to 500k resistance, is that the "sweet spot" for my clean tone might not be as touchy, and that volume swells might be a little smoother. Again, I'd like to know your opinions on the matter.
flawed logic. increasing the resistance value of the pot will make the adjustment of the volume controls MORE sensitive, not less. even more so, if you change to audio taper, rather than linear. the changes you're planning will take you farther away from your objectives, rather than closer.

the MAIN reason Gibson chose to use a lower value and linear pots rather than audio taper is to allow for better control when blending the two pickups together.
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#8
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
yyyup. 300k on Gibsons with 2 volumes. and linear, not audio taper.

the resistance in series with the output is zero, but the resistance in parallel with the pickup is the full value of the pot. the parallel resistance works with the internal inductance of the pickup to form a low-pass filter. lower resistance decreases the roll-off frequency.

flawed logic. increasing the resistance value of the pot will make the adjustment of the volume controls MORE sensitive, not less. even more so, if you change to audio taper, rather than linear. the changes you're planning will take you farther away from your objectives, rather than closer.

the MAIN reason Gibson chose to use a lower value and linear pots rather than audio taper is to allow for better control when blending the two pickups together.


I see. I didn't know any of that. So basically, for what I'm doing, I'm better off with what I've got now.
Thanks!
ALWAYS

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#9
Quote by xsouldriverx
in the end go for it and get either 500k CTS or 500k RS superpots. they are both better than the gibson stock ones. you might also want to change the caps (capacitors) out while your changing stuff in there.

sorry to double post, but what exactly would changing the caps do? also, the CTS and RS pots; are those brands available in 300k, and once again, what do you mean by "they are better"?
ALWAYS

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