#1
Hey everybody!

For the last two weeks or so, I have been playing guitar like crazy. In my free time I sit at home and play my guitar for hours, and I cant seem to put it down. I would like a practice schedule for playing...instead of just learning Buckethead songs and playing around with my effect pedals.

What sounds like a good practice regimine for practicing say... 5 hours?
#2
I'd say start with warm ups, then move on to scales, then learn songs, then do whatever the hell makes you happy.
#4
Quote by fixationdarknes
Depends what you're aiming for. What are your goals?


I really want to learn scales, gain speed, and be able to make a cool solo to anysong. I also would like to learn shawn lane style atonal stuff just for fun, and eventually write my own stuff... overall make myself a better guitar player.
#5
i think people should just play when they want and not have a formal schedule.....
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#6
Sometimes I put my iPod on 'Shuffle' and try to improvise to each song that comes on. Some are extremely hard to do, others much easier. Try it, it's great fun!
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#7
dang 5 hours is a lot lol. guess im not that dedicated. i play about an hour and a half to two hours a day.
#8
for scales, its all memorization. then you must apply them. like, put your music player on shuffle and just play along to any song that comes on. that'll teach you to use scales more comfortably and efficiently while teaching you how to do those solos you want to do. for speed, run scales up and down the neck is one way to do it. another way (the way i did it) is find a guitar player who plays fast and learn his stuff. im a bassist, so i used to learn all of the chili peppers songs. it helped immensely. and remember, playing songs at your level of skill can only maintain your skill, but playing things that are beyond you makes you better.
#9
alright im thinking something along the lines of this...

15 min warmups
1 hour excersizes
1 hour scales
1 hour solo improv.
1 hour-ish learning new songs
1 hour playing songs i already know (with metronome).

What do you think?
#10
I'd say combine the second and third ones into a general "technique" study. And frankly, I'd cut out the last hour. What's the use in playing something you already know, unless you mean you are trying to improve on something you have trouble playing.

All in all, pretty good. But, I would suggest learning songs only by ear. It will be very beneficial to you later on.
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#11
Quote by Iron_Dude
I'd say combine the second and third ones into a general "technique" study. And frankly, I'd cut out the last hour. What's the use in playing something you already know, unless you mean you are trying to improve on something you have trouble playing.

All in all, pretty good. But, I would suggest learning songs only by ear. It will be very beneficial to you later on.


Im talking about just reviewing some of the songs I don't have down completely, and am trying to make them 100%.

Why is it so important that I learn songs by ear? And would writing tabs help me?
Last edited by Dreikant at Jul 26, 2008,
#12
Seems like we're in similar situations.

I'd recommend torrenting the scans of Steve Vai's 30 hour workout.
It came from Total Guitar, but I think it's impossible to get a copy of that particluar issue now.
#13
Quote by Dreikant
I really want to learn scales, gain speed, and be able to make a cool solo to anysong. I also would like to learn shawn lane style atonal stuff just for fun, and eventually write my own stuff... overall make myself a better guitar player.


Well perhaps something like this...

-Three hours of technique (one hour of each, your choice, but I'd make a general suggestion of Alternate picking, Sweeping, Legato)
-4th hour - improvisation, scale study, ear training if you will
-5th hour - compose, study song structure and songs in general that you like

I'd say that would be a pretty good use of time toward your goals
#15
Warm Up for about 20 minutes and then Just play, i mean if you want to learn a new song sit down and learn it. If you want to work on scales, play through some scales for 20 minutes or so. I play about 4 hours each day, but i do that usually in 1 hour intervals. play for an hour, take a break for a little bit, go swimming do something else, then come back play for an hour. Every hour just say to yourself, ok im going to focus on this right now.
#16
Quote by ouchies
I think practicing guitar is like a workout.. you shouldn't just time everything, just take as long as it takes to complete what you are doing.


True, but good workouts generally have some kind of foundation as to how long they are going to take.
#17
instead of 1 hour exercises, why not get a new exercise everyday and only work on that exercise for that 1 hour time?

mix learning scales and improv together. The moment you can see the visualize the scale, start messing around. You're not going to be playing scales up and down and calling it music. a key a week would be good. something like review the scale for 10 minutes a day and then improvise. You either know the scale or you dont.

combine the last two hours also. you dont need to relearn those old songs, and if you do, isnt that learning a song then?

thats about 3 hours of practice. I was reading a joe satriani article and he said that you really don't need a whole day to practice. an hour of practice is enough if you're practicng correctly
#18
Quote by Iron_Dude
I And frankly, I'd cut out the last hour. What's the use in playing something you already know, unless you mean you are trying to improve on something you have trouble playing.


It's called performance practice and is about practicing your repertoire in a non stop fashion as if you were performing. You're not just practicing your songs like you would when you're learning them, you're practicing performing them. No stopping to work out mistakes no slowing down etc. I would suggest maybe standing up

I agree with the idea of putting the first two together into a technique study. You want some ear training and composition in there. Maybe even some singing practice.

Break it down in to smaller sessions with breaks between. 5 hours non stop is pretty full on and you are likely not absorbing as much in the later hours as you are in the first few. Maybe two or three 2 hour sessions would be good.

And maybe break up your technique and ear training into smaller blocks at the start of each session. These are mostly about improving strength, speed, flexibility, and coordination in your fingers. You are likely to get more benefit from three or four shorter bursts throughout the day with breaks in between than one full hour block spent on only technique.
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