#1
Is there a better way to learn scales (Rather than learning from a book)? I have the most trouble with scales, but I know I need to learn them.

I lose my concentration by F# Phrygian... Can anyone offer me some advice?
#2
Firstly, if you are playing what you call 'F# Phrygian' just by itself, then you really ought to be calling it a D major scale 3rd position.

Secondly, no. You must learn your major scale formula and how to play the same notes all over the neck before you begin playing any other, more complicated scales.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR
#3
Quote by Iron_Dude
Firstly, if you are playing what you call 'F# Phrygian' just by itself, then you really ought to be calling it a D major scale 3rd position.

Secondly, no. You must learn your major scale formula and how to play the same notes all over the neck before you begin playing any other, more complicated scales.



Alright thanks!
#4
Read the theory lesson in my sig. It explains scales and theory in a way nonspecific to the guitar. However, once you understand these concepts, you can easily apply that knowledge to the guitar. Since the article was written for guitarists, guitar examples are given. However, that lesson could be used to teach a piano player basic theory.

Read it.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Jul 26, 2008,
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Read the theory lesson in my book. It explains scales and theory in a way nonspecific to the guitar. However, once you understand these concepts, you can easily apply that knowledge to the guitar. Since the article was written for guitarists, guitar examples are given. However, that lesson could be used to teach a piano player basic theory.

Read it.

Hmm, when did you write a book? I don't see any book....
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR
#6
If you learn the basics of theory and how the intervals are arranged on the guitar first, learning scales is incredibly easy. It takes longer initially, but once you have that down you can play any scale just by knowing the intervals for that scale.
#7
Quote by Iron_Dude
Hmm, when did you write a book? I don't see any book....
While I am a published writer, that was a typo on my part; someone was asking about a book earlier. I also recall posting that late at night.