#1
if the bass is playing

G-----------------------------
D-----------------------------
A----3-1---6-4---4-3---8-6
E-1-1---4-4---2-2---6-6--

if I wanted the guitar to harmonize would this be considered harmonizing?

e--------------------------------
B--------------------------------
G--------------------------------
D--------------------------------
A----6-4---9-7---8-7----11-9
E-4-4---7-7---6-6---9-9-----

I ask this question cause I remember a few days / a week ago someone said a good idea for harmonizing is playing 3 frets up
#2
^ that would sound awful, unless of course you're going for the awful sound. i recommend reading the sticky on music theory to really learn how to harmonize, just "playing 3 frets up" is not the answer
#4
No, that'd be more like "playing different notes in the same kind of format that provide no good sound at all." A close relative of a harmony.

Like Z4twenny said, check the sticky. Or search the Lessons on the site itself for harmonizing tips.
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#5
not playing three frets up. That will sound like crap. Playing in thirds sounds good. Learn your theory.
#6
That would still be harmonizing it just wouldn't sound good. Try going by intervals instead of fret numbers (learn theory).
#7
Quote by GerGuam
That would still be harmonizing it just wouldn't sound good. Try going by intervals instead of fret numbers (learn theory).


I know basic theory, I guess i miss-read something.

what if the guitar was playing
e--------------------------------------
B--------------------------------------
G--------------------------------------
D--------------------------------------
A----9-8----13-11---11-9---15-13
E-8-8---11-11---9-9----13-13----

would that be better?
#8
You need to think in intervals, not frets. If you're just playing a set number of frets up, you're going to be out of any and you'll sound horrible.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Quote by Swap-Meet
those are all 5ths


Yes, but your earlier example gave the impression that you're simply playing a set number of frets up. Even fifths will not always be in key.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by Swap-Meet
but that is

His point is that if you go by a set number of frets it will screw you over at some point. The fact that it might be (I didn't check) in key this time is irrelevant.
#13
Quote by Swap-Meet
I know basic theory, I guess i miss-read something.

what if the guitar was playing
e--------------------------------------
B--------------------------------------
G--------------------------------------
D--------------------------------------
A----9-8----13-11---11-9---15-13
E-8-8---11-11---9-9----13-13----

would that be better?

That would sound like a bunch of power chords, **** yeah it would work! A root and a 5th are never a bad idea. You might like a root and a 4th better though. Starts on 6th fret instead of 8th
#14
Ok Im not the best person to listen to when it comes to theory. But I believe to harmonize something you would go to the scale two positions away.


Example


Ionian-Aeolian-Phrygian or I-VI-III

Dorian-Locrian-Lydian II-VII-IV

Phrygian-Ionian- Mixolydian III-I-V

Lydian-Aeolin-Dorian IV-VI-II

Mixolydian- Locrian- Phrygian V-VII-III

Aeolian-Ionian-Lydian VI-I-IV

Locrian- Dorian- Mixolydian VII-II-V

Someone correct me if I am Wrong on all this please.
#15
Quote by Myung'sMusicman
Someone correct me if I am Wrong on all this please.
You're wrong.

Read this: http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/soloing/soloing_basics_ii_part_3_-_harmonizing.html

Learn any theory he used via my sig.
#16
If you want to harmonize, you have to view the chords in your scale and you have to have the bass and guitar play different notes from these chords. Let's say you are writing in C major. The chords would be C - D min - E min - F - G - A min - B dim. If you had the bass play the root notes for all of the notes and had the guitar play perfect fifths for all of the notes, then you would be correctly harmonizing all of the chords except for the B dim, which uses a flatted fifth. When harmonizing, you have to look at the individual chords when determining which notes to use.
#17
A good idea would be to find out what key your first part is in. This will allow you to play thirds up from the original but still be in key to avoid it sounding out of key.

eg, if you had a simple riff like :

A: ----4-2-------
E:0-4-----4-2-4

Then you would work out it is in the key of E major and the notes are E, G#, C#, B and F#.
Then if you were harmonising in thirds you would start on each note and count two notes up, all the time in the key of E major (4 sharps). THis would give you G#, C#, E, D# and A which would be the intervals (all thirds) major, augmented, minor, augmented and minor therefore they wouldn't be a regular amount of frets apart. In tab this would end up as:


A:----7-6------
E:4-9----9-5-9
#18
Quote by bdof
That would sound like a bunch of power chords, **** yeah it would work! A root and a 5th are never a bad idea. You might like a root and a 4th better though. Starts on 6th fret instead of 8th


Parallel Fifths is a big no-no in part writing. Try again.
#19
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You're wrong.

Read this: http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/soloing/soloing_basics_ii_part_3_-_harmonizing.html

Learn any theory he used via my sig.


So what I said is it completely incorrect or just partially because I was taught that. I guess it doesn't fit into this thread being he was talking about bass and guitar but is that a way to harmonize scales?
#20
Quote by 5/4
Parallel Fifths is a big no-no in part writing. Try again.
I really don't think he's trying to impress some old dead composer, parallel fifths would sound fine.

Quote by Myung
Ok Im not the best person to listen to when it comes to theory. But I believe to harmonize something you would go to the scale two positions away.


Example


Ionian-Aeolian-Phrygian or I-VI-III

Dorian-Locrian-Lydian II-VII-IV

Phrygian-Ionian- Mixolydian III-I-V

Lydian-Aeolin-Dorian IV-VI-II

Mixolydian- Locrian- Phrygian V-VII-III

Aeolian-Ionian-Lydian VI-I-IV

Locrian- Dorian- Mixolydian VII-II-V

Someone correct me if I am Wrong on all this please.
I nearly understand what you're saying, if you explained it a bit more thoroughly I think I'd get it.

I think you're saying that if you have a melody in Ionian using the first position of the major scale, if you play the 'same thing' in the third position conforming the notes to the scale shape then you will be harmonising in diatonic thirds. That is correct
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#22
Modes have nothing to do with this. This is about intervals.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.