#1
So I know its common to write a chord progressions in Ionian(major) and Aeolian(minor) but is it common to write a Dorian or Lydian progression or any other mode for that matter other than locrain ofcourse? Or is it more common to just throw in a chord from another mode every so often like you would when soloing?
#2
Though i'm not very good in theory i do believe both are possible if you come up with chords using notes that stand out in a particular mode such as flattened or sharped 4ths, 6ths, whatever...
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#3
Writing a modal chord progression is great. I suggest you try it. It does take a little more care but is a great compositional exercise.
Si
#4
Quote by bradleysmith
So I know its common to write a chord progressions in Ionian(major) and Aeolian(minor) but is it common to write a Dorian or Lydian progression or any other mode for that matter other than locrain ofcourse? Or is it more common to just throw in a chord from another mode every so often like you would when soloing?
Truth be told, most songs dont use modal progressions. The ones that do are mostly jazz songs, romantic classical songs?, and maybe a pop songs. Some metal/rock riffs are based around modes, but would that be considered a modal progression?

Dorians very common (arent a couple of miles davis songs written like this?). Not so sure about lydian or mixolydian. Phrygian progressions are also sort of common, especially the whole i, bII, bIII progression.

Aeolian isnt actually that common (its meant to be used in flamenco heaps though), which is different to minor progressios. I dont think that modal progression can have out of key chords, and most minor progressions would need a few out of key chords to resolve.
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#5
Modes are unstable, meaning that they want to resolve to C or Am (if the parent parent scale is C). Thus, modal progressions are typically 1 or 2 chordd vamps. One chord will be the chord around which the mode is based; if you're writing in D Dorian, it will be Dm, E Phrygian and it's Em. The next chord should be a chord that contains the modal tone, the tones that makes that mode unique. In D Dorian, the modal tone is B, the natural 6, and the chords containing B are G7, Em, and Bdim. Bdim leads to C major, so it should be avoided. Therefore, your three chords available will be Dm, Em, and G7. From experience, I can tell you that Dm7 G7 is a great D Dorian progression.

Use this technique to find other modal progressions.

One more thing: Sometimes this becomes very hard. When this happens but you need to use that mode of yours, play over a static chord. Perhaps arpegiate said chord to make in interesting.

Key changes are also cool for modal progressions, especially when you're just using one chord. The following could be applied to a 1-chord vamp as well.

It would be interesting to play two vamps of D Dorian, one vamp of E Dorian, another vamp of D Dorian, and then repeat the whole thing. This is AABA format and is very common. Assuming one vamp is i7 IV7 i7 IV7, your progression would be Dm7 G7 Dm7 G7 Dm7 G7 Dm7 G7 Em7 A7 Am7 A7 Dm7 G7 Dm7 G7 and then repeat.

I picked E Dorian as the key change because when you play Em7 A7, the D7 chord leads back nicely to Dm. Also, since Em is one of the three chords for Dorian, it sounds good coming from G7.

Another thing: I've written everything as Dm7 G7. You could play regular Dm and it won't matter much, but the dom7 on the G chord is very important.
#6
^ Very helpful post, thanks. It's hard to find information on this sort of thing.
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