#1


I'm guessing its wear from strings, but why? and how can I make it stop? lol
#2
its wher you fingers are pressing down on fretboard, it happens over time, cant do much bout it cept not press very hard

EDIT: also comes with general wear and tear of the wood
#3
looks like you've got the dreaded red ring of death
Quote by AllPlayDead666
LazyGuitar
enjoy being reported for harrasment

LazyGuitar was a mod btw

Quote by MiniCheddarII
you dont know how much this new found ability to get porn means to me. Woooh!
#6
Well, it could be one of two things.

Either,

A) Shoddy craftsmanship. Someone did some filing there and you didn't notice.

or

B) You're pressing down with your string WAY too hard. Rosewood is a pretty soft wood, so it's not hard to dent with a bit of force. Hang on... Yup. I just dented my Precisions fretboard with my nail.

Based on your shock and surprise, I'm going to guess it's the latter. So either loosen up and don't grip so hard, or it could be a problem with the fret.

Try not pressing so hard though.

Now, fixing it. The only way you'll be able to do that is to take some sand paper to it. I don't see the point in this personally, it adds character to the bass and is hardly noticeable.

Hope I helped!
In the bass chat:

<Jon> take the quote of me out your sig plx
<Jon> i hate seeing what i said around lol


Leader of the Bass Militia PM to join!



And now on BANDCAMP!


Officially the funniest member of the Bass Forum.
#7
I have that on my fretboard too
only had the bass for a year
but it is a really cheap instrument
(and really only for BEA)

I suspect wear.
Lord Gold feeds from your orifices and he wants to see you sweat.
Lord Gold probes you publicly and makes your pussy wet.
Now say his name.....
#8
I'm cleaning it up to sell and just noticed it. Its my Squier VM P by the way. I noticed the same thing on my SUB, so I guess I need to lighten up :/

Thanks guys, I have a couple more questions. What price should I sell my VM P for and which way would I turn the truss rod to get rid of fret buzz on high frets?
#9
On price--check Ebay and Craigs list for used prices or PM LesPaulStudio (Rick) who has the blue book for instrument pricing.

On the other check out Ben's write up on bass maintenance and I'll leave the rest of the truss rod discussion to better minds than mine.
#10
Quote by Miss G
I'm cleaning it up to sell and just noticed it. Its my Squier VM P by the way. I noticed the same thing on my SUB, so I guess I need to lighten up :/

Thanks guys, I have a couple more questions. What price should I sell my VM P for and which way would I turn the truss rod to get rid of fret buzz on high frets?


About $250 is the average on eBay when I just looked.

Sounds like you have too much bow in your neck, so you want to tighten the truss rod I believe, so turn it anti-clockwise. Remember, lefty-loosey, righty-tighty
In the bass chat:

<Jon> take the quote of me out your sig plx
<Jon> i hate seeing what i said around lol


Leader of the Bass Militia PM to join!



And now on BANDCAMP!


Officially the funniest member of the Bass Forum.
#11
Quote by JakdOnCrack
You're going to bow your neck if you take off all of your strings at the same time, FYI

Please do, explain.
Quote by MoshPitRock
ANIMALS LIE DOWN.
that's just what they do.
there's probably humans doing the same thing.
quit being so paranoid.


#12
Try not pushing down between frets :P
Quote by telecastrmastr
if this goes in someones signature im gunna be pissed


Quote by jimithrash
what do you mean by goat
#14
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Pushing down on the frets is bad technique as far as I know.


Yup.

You press down just behind the fret. Further away and not enough pressure is placed on the string near the fret, causing fret buzz.

Too close and you can "roll" over onto the next fret, or diminish the sustain of the note.
In the bass chat:

<Jon> take the quote of me out your sig plx
<Jon> i hate seeing what i said around lol


Leader of the Bass Militia PM to join!



And now on BANDCAMP!


Officially the funniest member of the Bass Forum.
#15
Quote by Teh_Asian_Pro
Please do, explain.


Your trussrod is designed to counter-act the tension from the steel strings on the neck. With the string tension gone, you've got a steel trussrod bending a wooden neck wherever it wants to go.

The best way to change your strings is one at a time.

About the trussrod: it's critical for proper care of the bass, but it's also the easiest way to *** it up. When adjusting, only make 1/8th of a turn per day in the direction you want to go, and no more. Check the neck each day until it has the proper relief. Never use the trussrod to adjust action, only relief. Adjust your bridge and nut first, and then make minor trussrod tweaks. If you don't know what you're doing, take it to a professional.
"Comedy's a dead art form. Now tragedy, that's funny." -Bender Bending Rodriguez
#16
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Pushing down on the frets is bad technique as far as I know.



Trust me, I have the right technique.
#18
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Great. I wasn't even referring to you.

Yeah, who would doubt that Miss G has proper technique?
Les Claypool
Geddy Lee
Robert DeLeo
Flea

Weileder

...Coincidence? I think not.
#19
Quote by mountaindew88
Your trussrod is designed to counter-act the tension from the steel strings on the neck. With the string tension gone, you've got a steel trussrod bending a wooden neck wherever it wants to go.

The best way to change your strings is one at a time.

About the trussrod: it's critical for proper care of the bass, but it's also the easiest way to *** it up. When adjusting, only make 1/8th of a turn per day in the direction you want to go, and no more. Check the neck each day until it has the proper relief. Never use the trussrod to adjust action, only relief. Adjust your bridge and nut first, and then make minor trussrod tweaks. If you don't know what you're doing, take it to a professional.



Alot of places i have read have always said 'whip 'em all off' it not like they are off for long, long enough to clean the fret board/body and back on. I could see that if they were off for a prolonged period that it would cause a problem, but not for a half hour period. Just though i would add something
#20
Quote by Kethnus
Alot of places i have read have always said 'whip 'em all off' it not like they are off for long, long enough to clean the fret board/body and back on. I could see that if they were off for a prolonged period that it would cause a problem, but not for a half hour period. Just though i would add something


Question. Would you really want to risk it?

I have a red bass that i used to take all of the strings off to re-string. Needless to say the neck bowed (otherwise why would i be posting this story lol). The strings were 100s and it is a thick neck. I went on to mess up my truss rod but thats not the point. It was never put near a radiator and i looked after it really well (only damage it got was a lost plastic switch thingymabob).

Moral or the story. Don't take all your stings off unless you know how to rectify your truss rod without messing up. Or just don't do it atall if you can help it.
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
what would that be called? a Fibson with Gender confusion issues?
#21
Quote by |Heretic|
Question. Would you really want to risk it?

I have a red bass that i used to take all of the strings off to re-string. Needless to say the neck bowed (otherwise why would i be posting this story lol). The strings were 100s and it is a thick neck. I went on to mess up my truss rod but thats not the point. It was never put near a radiator and i looked after it really well (only damage it got was a lost plastic switch thingymabob).

Moral or the story. Don't take all your stings off unless you know how to rectify your truss rod without messing up. Or just don't do it atall if you can help it.


I normally take 2 strings off, clean half of the fingerboard, put the two strings back on. then repeat the process for the remaining strings.