#1
Its kinda a slow-ish eastern sounding riff that i chanced across, i want to add to it so would like to know what scale it might have been built around. Thanks.

e ----7--6--------6--7--7/9---6-----6------------------------------
b ----------9--9-----------------9------7----7/11--10--9---7--9--7----
g ------------------------------------------------------------------9
#2
E F F# G# A A#

More chromatic than anything I know of.

Hey guys! I just started playing electric guitar should I get a Gabson Lay Pall or a Femdor Startokaster. I like the picks on the gabsons but i like how sweet femdors look. Beforre i get a gabson what company makes them?
#3
Edit: While everything I said is true, I think it would be best used over an Emaj7 chord.

Everything fits in the B major scale except that A note, 10 on the B string. You could use it over a B major chord.

However, you could also use it over an F#7 chord for a bluesy sound. You'll want to add an extra F# note to the end of that lick, though, to make it resolved.


WARNING: MODE CONTENT

The notes of the B major scale over a F# or F#7 chord is F# mixolydian. The combination of the mixolydian scale with the minor third and diminished fifth is very common in the blues. This is often called the hybrid blues scale and it is a the combination of the mixolydian and blues scales. So...the combination of the F# mixolydian sound and the little bit of F# blues via the A note (the minor third) would be great as an F# blues lick over an F#7 chord in an F# blues. However, F# isn't a common key, so I suggest moving everything up a fret and playing over a G blues.

Another alternative is to play that exact lick (not up a fret) over an Emaj7 chord for an E Lydian sound.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Jul 26, 2008,
#4
Quote by bangoodcharlote

WARNING: MODE CONTENT

The notes of the B major scale over a F# or F#7 chord is F# mixolydian. The combination of the mixolydian scale with the minor third and diminished fifth is very common in the blues. This is often called the hybrid blues scale and it is a the combination of the mixolydian and blues scales. So...the combination of the F# mixolydian sound and the little bit of F# blues via the A note (the minor third) would be great as an F# blues lick over an F#7 chord in an F# blues. However, F# isn't a common key, so I suggest moving everything up a fret and playing over a G blues.

Another alternative is to play that exact lick (not up a fret) over an Emaj7 chord for an E Lydian sound.



O_o?? wtf?
#5
lumberjackted11:
WARNING: MODE CONTENT means : WARNING: for the eyes or guitarmunky, bgc demonic and other grade 8 MT regulars

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Edit: While everything I said is true, I think it would be best used over an Emaj7 chord.

Everything fits in the B major scale except that A note, 10 on the B string. You could use it over a B major chord.

However, you could also use it over an F#7 chord for a bluesy sound. You'll want to add an extra F# note to the end of that lick, though, to make it resolved.


WARNING: MODE CONTENT

The notes of the B major scale over a F# or F#7 chord is F# mixolydian. The combination of the mixolydian scale with the minor third and diminished fifth is very common in the blues. This is often called the hybrid blues scale and it is a the combination of the mixolydian and blues scales. So...the combination of the F# mixolydian sound and the little bit of F# blues via the A note (the minor third) would be great as an F# blues lick over an F#7 chord in an F# blues. However, F# isn't a common key, so I suggest moving everything up a fret and playing over a G blues.

Another alternative is to play that exact lick (not up a fret) over an Emaj7 chord for an E Lydian sound.

Mixolydian with a b3 and b5? 1,2,b3,4,b5,6,b7. tis a minor7b5 chord!!! On a more serious note, that interests me and I shall mess with it later. Thanks for bringin it up Sue.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#7
Quote by metallicafan616
lumberjackted11:
WARNING: MODE CONTENT means : WARNING: for the eyes or guitarmunky, bgc demonic and other grade 8 MT regulars



What Sue said is spot on though.

The only F# blues I can think of offhand is Texas Flood, actually, but the ideas she brings up all make very clear sense.
#8
Quote by metallicafan616
lumberjackted11:
WARNING: MODE CONTENT means : WARNING: for the eyes or guitarmunky, bgc demonic and other grade 8 MT regulars

Hey, I understood it!
I <3 bangoodcharlotte

Quote by humperdunk
one time i let my cat has cheezburger. i thought it was pretty funny.
#9
Quote by metal4all
Mixolydian with a b3 and b5? 1,2,b3,4,b5,6,b7.
Combine them into a hybrid scale: 1 2 b3 3 4 b5 5 6 b7.

Quote by :-D
The only F# blues I can think of offhand is Texas Flood, actually, but the ideas she brings up all make very clear sense.
And even that's G tuned down a half step (so it's Gb not F#, but I could have approached everything else as Gb rather than F#).

Regardless, F# is not a common key.


For the record, "WARNING: MODE CONTENT" means that the post will be complex and I really don't feel like explaining the whys of it. Read it at your own risk.
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Combine them into a hybrid scale: 1 2 b3 3 4 b5 5 6 7.

Ohh. I do that with all my playing. Adding in b3's and b5's in random spots, then bending them up to their respective diatonic notes is quite fun. Just one of my little habits... like horrible phrasing lol.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#11
Quote by metal4all
Ohh. I do that with all my playing. Adding in b3's and b5's in random spots, then bending them up to their respective diatonic notes is quite fun.
It's good blues stuff.
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
And even that's G tuned down a half step (so it's Gb not F#, but I could have approached everything else as Gb rather than F#).

Yes, I meant to add in that because of the tuning it can be seen on the neck the same way as a G blues.
#13
Quote by Mongoose87
Hey, I understood it!

then your probably grade 8 or a MT regular

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#14
Very helpful reply, bangoodcharlote... some further questions:

Quote by bangoodcharlote
... I think it would be best used over an Emaj7 chord.

... You could use it over a B major chord.

... However, you could also use it over an F#7 chord for a bluesy sound.


I worked on the riff a little more, i want to give it a slow jazzy feel and want to intersperse playing short sections of the riff, then strum a chord, and go back to the riff etc. What (other) chords can you suggest?

You'll want to add an extra F# note to the end of that lick, though, to make it resolved.


Ah yes, it resolves nicely at the 11th fret, G string.

The notes of the B major scale over a F# or F#7 chord is F# mixolydian


The F# mixolydian fits very nicely. For other riffs, i've also used the F#minor pentatonic.

Quote by :-D
:

The only F# blues I can think of offhand is Texas Flood...


I was watching a Blues teaching video recently and the instructor taught Otis Rush's 'All Your Love' in F#minor blues.
#15
Quote by geetarmanic
I worked on the riff a little more, i want to give it a slow jazzy feel and want to intersperse playing short sections of the riff, then strum a chord, and go back to the riff etc. What (other) chords can you suggest?
I would suggest playing an Emaj7* chord and then your lick, then F# and then your lick, and repeat this 4 times. After that, go into an E Lydian vamp with Emaj7* and F#.

*Since this is an E Lydian vamp, use Emaj7#11 at your discretion.

Obviously, what I just said follows strict modal guidelines; feel free to do whatever sounds good. I encourage (require!) experimentation when you're practicing.
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I would suggest playing an Emaj7* chord and then your lick, then F# and then your lick, and repeat this 4 times. After that, go into an E Lydian vamp with Emaj7* and F#.

*Since this is an E Lydian vamp, use Emaj7#11 at your discretion.

Obviously, what I just said follows strict modal guidelines; feel free to do whatever sounds good. I encourage (require!) experimentation when you're practicing.


That's great... thanks. Actually, the riff has a more Spanish feel than jazzy/eastern... the chords you suggested work well, so any more suggestions welcome. For example, can i use any of the F# chords, such as F#m, F#7 etc.? I'm looking for a third chord as well, so i have Emaj7, F# and _____?