#1
Disaster struck! Well, at least I think it did.

I pulled the first one, and along the fret slot were all these teeny tinychips that would come up where the fret tangs had been in the wood. The frets were compression fit with zero glue, just a touch of filler on each end to clean up the look of things. I tried going slower, going faster, I tried oiling the fret slots to ease the removal, but nothing helped! The way I pulled them was with a small pair of nippers with the face ground flat, not much unlike the Stew Mac puller. Also, I started at one end of the fretts and very slowly, I'd say about 3-4 mm at a time, moved my way acoss the fret slowly easing out the frets by letting the inside of the nippers act like a wedge to force the frets out. I didn't yank, or even pull. I couldn't think of a way to avoid it, and they were pretty small, so I finished pulling the rest, all with pretty much the same result. Here's a pic:



So, is that normal, or is that something that can be avoided in the future? This was the first time I have pulled frets, and it's on a really cheap neck, so no worries as for ruining the neck. However, if this is NOT supposed to happen, how do I make sure it doesn't happen the next time I pull frets ( which may or may not be tomorrow )?
#2
what kind of guitar is this?
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#3
all frets are like that, so no worries.
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#4
I read/heard that heating the fret with a soldering iron or something like that prevents chipping.

Never tried it myself though, but the pics looked great.

Edit:

Link:
http://www.guitarattack.com/tele/neckrepair/sagakit2neck.htm
Look at Step 2.
#5
chipping is normal. dress the board with a radius block. it's probably best to glue the little pieces back into place but if you didnt, dress it down a little and see where it goes from there.
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#6
Quote by Invader Jim
I read/heard that heating the fret with a soldering iron or something like that prevents chipping.

Never tried it myself though, but the pics looked great.

Edit:

Link:
http://www.guitarattack.com/tele/neckrepair/sagakit2neck.htm
Look at Step 2.


I tried that, but it didn't help. I think the idea there it to heat up the glue so it melts, therefore creating less trauma to the area when the frets are pulled. However, mine had no glue, so heating the frets didn't do much. I do have a radius block and I was going to re-radius the fingerboard, so I guess it's not a very big deal after all .
#7
Yea its pretty common for rosewood to do this. Ebony is supposed to be worse about it.
#8
I gather that this is normal, and mostly to be expected. It's like pulling an arrowhead out of something; you can't avoid splitting, because of how the tang is shaped.

You'll probably need to glue the replacement frets, because they won't sit as tightly with the fret slots having already been spread/damaged slightly.
#9
Heat alone isn't enough. Heat with a steam iron. It' softens the wood and stops chipping. Too much heat and steam can damage the neck but not enough causes chipping.
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#10
what's your plan for the neck? new frets or fretless?
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#11
Quote by CorduroyEW
Heat alone isn't enough. Heat with a steam iron. It' softens the wood and stops chipping. Too much heat and steam can damage the neck but not enough causes chipping.

So I have to...iron the frets?
#12
Quote by Invader Jim
So I have to...iron the frets?


Yeah, what do you mean use a steam iron??

Quote by funguy
what's your plan for the neck? new frets or fretless?


I got the neck to get some experience re-freting, so that's what I'll be doing, although it might be fun to string it up while they are out since I've never even played a fretless...
#13
you might wanna file the nut down, if you're gonna go fretless.... just for your action's and fingers' sake.

you could just bolt it onto random guitars, and see how each one sounds fretless, no need for intonation worries :P
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#15
Quote by Invader Jim
So I have to...iron the frets?


Yup.

Quote by lumberjack
Yeah, what do you mean use a steam iron??


I use a iron like you would use to iron clothes. turn the steam up as high as it can go. Hold it about 3 inches above the neck of the guitar and start moving it around. Heat and steam in any 1 place of too long will damage your neck but if you give it just the right amount it'll stop damage to the neck.
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Last edited by CorduroyEW at Jul 28, 2008,