#1
Or is it just something I develop with influences and experience?
#2
Listen to a lot of David Gilmore solos to get an idea for phrasing.
#3
steve vai has excellent solos. he learned phrasing by transcribing vocals into guitar tab. so just dl a guitar pro tab and learn te vocal track on guitar. it helps alot
Quote by Twist of fate
Once, I watched Star Wars episode 4. I timed myself so that I came right when the death star blew up.

Afterwards, Han Solo said "Great shot kid, that was one in a million!"
#4
Scott Henderson has a great jazz rock dvd out that explains it well, with a bunch of other good to know stuff.
#5
start learning jazz methodology and theory and apply it to whatever music you wanna play. Listen to a lot of musicians with good phrasing. Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, some of John Petrucci, Chet Atkins, Pat Metheny, Joe Pass, Wes Montgomery
Gear:Schecter C1+
Peavey Triple XXX 120 Watt Tube Head
Mesa/Boogie 2x12 Recto Cab

Mesa/Boogie 4x12 Stilletto Cab<<--600$ for sale ask me

Credentials: BFA in Theater Performance, BM in Music Composition
#6
Always try something different and think outside of the box. It'll get better with experience.
Quote by Kensai
I know a good joke:

Women's rights.
Quote by Chubbychunks
I know a good joke:

Kensai's life.
#7
Quote by demigod90234
start learning jazz methodology and theory and apply it to whatever music you wanna play. Listen to a lot of musicians with good phrasing. Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, some of John Petrucci, Chet Atkins, Pat Metheny, Joe Pass, Wes Montgomery

How would I go about learning Jazz? I know it's hard, and I'm just in the beginning of Theory.
#9
Quote by pwrmax
Listen to a lot of David Gilmore solos to get an idea for phrasing.

gilmour not gilmore
and yeah david is a great phrasers
Gear:
Fender MIA Strat w/EMG SA's
Fender Super 60
Boss RT-20 Rotary Sim
Ibanez AD-9 Analog Delay
EHX Big Muff

"Doctor Kindly Tell Your Wife
That I'm Alive, Flowers Thrive
Realise, Realise, Realise"
#10
Listen to many many artists, and mimic how they start and end their phrases, and where they emphasize the melody.
Jesus for president. PM me to join the campaign. or just sig it.

Of course God has a sense of humor. Look at the Platypus...

Member #9 of the Trumpet Players' Alliance, PM E V H 5150 to inquire about joining.
#11
Watch Scott Henderson's Melodic Phrasing video.
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#12
Quote by enemy120
gilmour not gilmore
and yeah david is a great phrasers


My bad. Ironically, there is a guitarist called David Gilmore.
#13
Quote by Resiliance
Watch Scott Henderson's Melodic Phrasing video.

Link?
#14
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#15
I think it's perhaps a combination of listening to other players, emulating the phrasing of talking, and perhaps even making diagrams to see where the notes fall on the beat.
#16
Quote by zeemonkey
steve vai has excellent solos. he learned phrasing by transcribing vocals into guitar tab. so just dl a guitar pro tab and learn te vocal track on guitar. it helps alot

steve vai did much more than that, lol. There isn't really a way to learn it overnight. Practice.
Follow me on instagram @createdaily
#18
I second David Gilmour. Try out "Comfortably Numb", "Another Brick in the Wall Pt II", and "Time".

If those don't give you a crash starter course on phrasing (assuming of course, you play them correctly), nothing can.

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE
#19
Marty Friedman's 99 hot licks. It's a bit expensive so just video google it to see if you like it. It has licks with interesting phrases in it.
Patrick Star of The Jelly fishing Club PM darkstar2644 to Join
#20
I got another question. The whole sentence and paragraph things made sense to me and helped a lot. Now that I look at a lot of my favorite solos, they all have that kind of construction to them. Now, how do I go about choosing specific notes?
#21
All good advice, but... It's interesting that the tendency is to refer you to other guitar players for examples. The cool thing about the subject of phrasing is that it's a musical thing, not a guitar thing.

Phrasing, in fact, actually has some technical definitions within music theory with regard to the length of a phrase (4 bars), and the lengths of what are called sentences (multiple phrases, such as 8 bars).

Regardless of that (because it's really irrelevant) I would suggest taking the listening to jazz approach, but not necessarily listening to jazz guitarists, but rather jazz horn players. That's actually how many of the great jazz guitarists learned.

A horn player's phrases must be efficient, because they only have the duration of a sigle breath to get it out. No time for messing around, and they don't have the luxury that guitar players have of playing endlessly. We have a tendency, because of how we practice as guitar players (endlessly running scales and such non-stop for an hour), to gravitate to that kind of playing. Horn players can teach you a lot.
Jam On!
#22
Quote by fob12
How would I go about learning Jazz? I know it's hard, and I'm just in the beginning of Theory.


Buy some books: The Real Book will be your bible. if you can't read music learn to, pickup the Mel Bay Guitare Journals: Jazz, it has prime examples of melodies, soos, and chord solos as well as jazz chord fingerings. most importantly Listen to a bunch of records. knowing the theory is only part of being a good musician, you need to engulf yourself in music and listen to a lot of people who have been labeled as legends or masters
Gear:Schecter C1+
Peavey Triple XXX 120 Watt Tube Head
Mesa/Boogie 2x12 Recto Cab

Mesa/Boogie 4x12 Stilletto Cab<<--600$ for sale ask me

Credentials: BFA in Theater Performance, BM in Music Composition
#23
Quote by demigod90234
Buy some books: The Real Book will be your bible. if you can't read music learn to, pickup the Mel Bay Guitare Journals: Jazz, it has prime examples of melodies, soos, and chord solos as well as jazz chord fingerings. most importantly Listen to a bunch of records. knowing the theory is only part of being a good musician, you need to engulf yourself in music and listen to a lot of people who have been labeled as legends or masters

Sounds good, I enjoy Jazz, but what about for now? How do I choose each note and stuff like that? What's the "rule" for tension and releasing tension?
#24
One of my favorites for phrasing, and generally kick-assery, is Chris Poland. Check out his solo albums is you can find them somewhere It's great. It changed the way I looked at phrasing since I was so use to hearing things in traditional rock and metal settings. He actually uses lots of minor pentatonic stuff, but I couldn't tell until I started transcribing some of his licks.

Some of my favorites if you're interested:

From the CD Return to Metalopolis:

Row of Crows
The Fall of Babylon
Return to Metalopolis
Beezlebub Bop
Club Ded

From the CD Chasing the Sun:

Chasing the Sun
Sand Castles
Cosmo's Thumb
Interference Blues

From his albums with Ohm:

Everything.

Not specifically, listen to a lot of different artists from lots of genres. One artist alone won't help you develop your own phrasing style
#25
While "phrasing" seems to be something that's hard to pin down in terms of
what to EXACTLY practice for it, there are some very concrete things you can
do for practice that will help a lot.

If you think about the basic components that go into making up a phrase, the
important standout parts are rhtyhm and timing and dynamics. If you can't do
those things pretty well as separate skills, you're probably going to find it harder
to come up with good phrases.

One thing I like to do is take the same scale run. pattern, lick, arpeggio, sequence...
and play it with a vareity of rhythms and permutations. For example, take the
same thing and play it as 8th notes, triplets, 16ths..., start on upbeat, on down
beat... lots of simple different ways to play the same thing. This not only helps
your timing precision and control, but also shows you how the same notes, played
in the same order, can sound entirely different depending on how you relate them
to the beat and pulse of the music. To me, that's the very heart of what phrasing
is all about.
#26
Quote by fob12
is it just something I develop with influences and experience?


It can be, but you can also study it and practice it.

- learn what phrases are

- when you listen to music, pay attention to the phrasing

- practice composing / playing phrases

- practice improving over a backing track, and focus on your phrasing.
shred is gaudy music